Habeas Corpus

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Habeas Corpus and Why It Can Be Suspended From Detainees
Ira Brim
American Intercontinental University

Abstract
In this essay the subject of Habeas Corpus and what events that take place to have Habeas Corpus to he suspended by executive orders from the President’s of the United States. The circumstances, that transpired that empower certain presidents to have such authority gave down by Congress, to implement the extreme acts to protect our Nation. The two most important issues for our country are to keep National Security and Public Safety. But in the time war or an act of aggression on United State soil, Presidents have to use his commander and chief obligations without a lot diplomatic procedures. The objective of this essay is to give three of the most historical suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act of 1679 handed down from England, and to give what action were taken and how the writ of Habeas Corpus was re-instated by congress. On the final explanation, how right of Habeas Corpus and why inmates use this as the final resources to petition for re-investigate cases and the courts do not wrongfully imprison innocent people.

Habeas Corpus and Why It Can Be Suspended From Detainees Habeas Corpus is a writ that was formed as Habeas Corpus Act of 1679 and is used to keep and individual from being unlawfully imprisoned. It is not to established guilt or innocence. In the history of Habeas Corpus, in the United States, Presidents had used their war-time executive order power to suspend Habeas Corpus Act of 1679 and/or declared martial law in some of the cases researched. Presidents Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and George W. Bush are the most prominent names in concerning suspension of Habeas Corpus. In civilian courts, the U.S. Supreme overseer’s petitions for Habeas Corpus, but most cases are for prisoner’s death role or prisoners that are serving life sentence for murder, rare, or three-strike offenders. In all of this, suspension of

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