gROTİOS

Topics: Law, Political philosophy, Political science Pages: 2 (715 words) Published: November 3, 2014

The English School of international relations theory (sometimes also referred to as Liberal Realism, the International Society school or the British institutionalists) maintains that there is a 'society of states' at the international level, despite the condition of anarchy (that is, the lack of a global ruler or world state). The English school stands for the conviction that ideas, rather than simply material capabilities, shape the conduct of international politics, and therefore deserve analysis and critique. In this sense it is similar to constructivism, though the English School has its roots more in world history, international law and political theory, and is more open to normative approaches than is generally the case with constructivism. The English School can also be seen as a via media between realism and liberalism/cosmopolitanism[1] but also has independent elements that clearly distinguish it from these theories. The English School of international relations theory (sometimes also referred to as Liberal Realism, the International Society school or the British institutionalists) maintains that there is a 'society of states' at the international level, despite the condition of anarchy (that is, the lack of a global ruler or world state). The English school stands for the conviction that ideas, rather than simply material capabilities, shape the conduct of international politics, and therefore deserve analysis and critique. In this sense it is similar to constructivism, though the English School has its roots more in world history, international law and political theory, and is more open to normative approaches than is generally the case with constructivism. The English School can also be seen as a via media between realism and liberalism/cosmopolitanism[1] but also has independent elements that clearly distinguish it from these theories. The English School of international relations theory (sometimes also referred to as Liberal Realism,...
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