Great expectations ch 1-7

Topics: Great Expectations, Charles Dickens, Miss Havisham Pages: 6 (1759 words) Published: January 12, 2014
PART I

CHAPTER I
Vocabulary
nettles - prickly plants
aforesaid - previously mentioned
briars - thorny plants
wittles - [dialect] food
weather-cock - a weather vane
gibbet - a device used to hang people, gallows

l. How does Pip get his name? Where is he at the beginning of the story? Pip gets his name because his father’s name is Pirrip and his real name is Philip and when he was little he couldn’t say the name so he called himself Pip. At the beginning of the story he is at a marsh country down by the river.

2. Briefly describe the convict. What evidence is there that the convict has "human" qualities and is not merely a criminal? The convict is a fearful man all in coarse gray, with a great iron on his leg, no hat, with broken shoes, and had an old rag tied around his head. The evidence that supports that the convict has human qualities is he somewhat shows compassion when seeing Pip’s dead parents so he does not rob him he just scares Pip and asks him to do a favor.

3. Why do you think Pip believes the convict's story about his accomplice? I believe Pip believes the convict’s story because he scares Pip half to death and Pip is still young a naive and is genuinely afraid of the man and what is coming out of his mouth.

4. Find an example of dialect in the convict's dialogue which illustrates the way Dickens separates the upper from the lower classes by their speech patterns. An example of dialect used for lower class is “now lookee here” the lower class had more of a slang and didn't speak as educated as the upper class who talked like “Oh! don't cut my throat,sir.”

CHAPTER II
Vocabulary
jack-towel- a towel hung on a roller
connubial - relating to marriage
trenchant - perceptive; vigorous
freemasonry - a fellowship
consternation - worry; paralyzing dismay
remonstrance - protest
boot-jack - a device used to hold a boot secure when taking the boot off imbrue - to soak
accredited - credited with
interlocutor - a speaker
speaking-trumpet - a device used to amplify sound
mincemeat - finely chopped meat, sometimes mixed with other food

1. Dickens is well known for his revealing and amusing descriptions of the characters in his book. How does the following description of Mrs. Joe Gargery help the reader understand her character? "My sister, Mrs. Joe, with black hair and eyes, had such a prevailing redness of skin. That I sometimes used to wonder whether it was possible she washed herself with a nutmeg-grater instead of soap. She was tall and bony, and almost always wore a coarse apron, fastened over her figure behind with two loops. and having a square impregnable bib in front, that was stuck full of pins and needles." The following description helps the reader understand her character by helping paint a picture as for who raised Pip and the reader not only gets to hear about her but can now visualize her too.

2. Dickens includes humor in his stories in several ways. One of them is through double meanings, or puns. Find an example of a phrase in this chapter that can have two meanings, one serious and one humorous. “where have you been, you young monkey” and “tell me directly what you have been doing to wear me away with fret and fright and worrit” 3. Briefly describe Joe. List the ways Joe tries to protect Pip from his wife. He tries to lighten Pips way and tells him their friends and sort of takes more of his wife's wrath away from Pips attention. 4. Why is Pip given tar water to drink?

It was used as a medicine to soothe his throat.
5. Why does Pip wait until dawn to rob the pantry? What does he steal? What are the Hulks? because he does not want to get caught and he steals bread,cheese, half a jar of minced meat, and some brandy from a stoned bottle. Hulks- ships that hold the prisoners/murderers/thefts CHAPTER III

Vocabulary
rimy - frosty
cravat - a tie
ague - fever and chills
rheumatic - painfully arthritic

1. How does Pip's convict react when he learns Pip has met...
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