Grand Theory

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For the comparison discussion I will be comparing Virginia Henderson’s grand theory of Principles and Practice of Nursing to Levine’s Consevation Model of Nursing. The article I used was, “Testing a Theory of Health Promotion for Preterm Infants Based on Levine’s Conservation Model of Nursing,” by Linda Medfford, and, Martha Raile Alligood. Virginia Henderson’s grand theory of Principles and Practice of Nursing, it is explained that the grand theory is for the brain dead patient. This theory points out to the nurse that, “An indirect link also exists between the nurse caring for the organ donor and the patient or patients who might receive an organ or organs from the donor, in that the nurse’s actions and care can affect the viability of the organs intended for waiting recipients” (Nicely, B., & DeLario, G. T. (2011). Virginia Henderson’s Grand Theory is split up into a number of sections. These sections include, but are not limited to, normal breathing, eating, drinking, and elimination of body waist. This area describes the brain dead, or impaired patient. The article goes on to outline and describe the care needed for the nurse to properly handle and care for the brain dead patient or the patient who would be a possible organ donor. A much different theory described in Levine’s Consevation Model of Nurse is a theory with “Proposes that the crisis event of a preterm birth creates environmental challenges for both the infant and the family and survival of both the infant and the family system requires rapid and ongoing engagement with the process of adaptive change” (Alligood, M.R., & Mefford, L.C.). The major comparison of these two theories is the quality of care when using consistency to care for one life and the quality of care to care for the life of organs, and the humans retaining the organs. While Virginia Henderson’s grand theory is about the preservation of organs and the humans with the organs, Levine’s Consevation Model is the consistency


References: Alligood, M.R., & Mefford, L.C. Testing a Theory of Health Promotion for Preterm Infants Based on Levine’s Conservation Model of Nursing. The Journal of Theory Construction & Testing, 15(2). Retrieved May 21, 2013, from https://learn.maryville.edu/content/enforced/3141036-13SUNURS60012/Readings/W3_Peplau.pdf?_&d2lSessionVal=hnBOgoi2QbaF8monouv05MsHh&ou=3141036 Nicely, B., & DeLario, G. T. (2011). Virginia Henderson 's principles and practice of nursing applie to organ donation after brain death. Progress in Transplantation, 21(1), 72-77.

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