Chapter 1
The Government and Not-For-Profit Environment

TRUE/FALSE (CHAPTER 1)

1. The main objective of a typical governmental or not-for-profit entity is to earn a profit.

2. A government’s budget may be backed by the force of law.

3. Governmental entities have no need for an accounting system.

4. A government’s internal managers rely on general purpose financial statements for a considerable amount of information about their government.

5. Governments and not-for-profits may never engage in business-type activities.

6. Lenders use the financial statements of governments and not-for profits just as they would those of businesses, that is, to help assess the borrower’s credit-worthiness.

7. Financial statements, no matter how prepared, do not directly affect the economic worth of an entity.

8. The Financial Accounting Standards Advisory Board’s standards do not apply to the federal Department of Treasury.

9. Governments may be subject to the same pressures that led to accounting scandals like Enron.

10. The Governmental Accounting Standards Board establishes generally accepted accounting principles for all state and local government entities, as well as all not-for-profit entities.

MULTIPLE CHOICE (CHAPTER 1)

1. A primary characteristic that distinguishes governmental entities from business entities is
a) The need to generate revenues equal to or in excess of expenditures/expenses.
b) The importance of the budget in the governing process.
c) The need to provide goods or services.
d) The correlation between revenues generated and demand for goods or services.

2. A primary characteristic that distinguishes not-for-profit entities from business entities is a) The need to generate revenues equal to or in excess of expenditures/expenses. b) The importance of the budget in the governing process. c) The need to provide goods or services. d) The correlation between revenues generated and demand for

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