Global Energy

Topics: Natural gas, Carbon dioxide, World energy resources and consumption Pages: 23 (13750 words) Published: October 30, 2014

0166370
Global Energy: Sustainability and Moving
Towards a
Low-Carbon Future
ENVM 652 Fall 2011

Garmeh Brown
Elizabeth Jenny
Hermione Toussaint

TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY……………………………………………………………………………3 1.0 INTRODUCTION…………………………………………………………………………………4 2.0 WHAT ROLE DOES CARBON PLAY IN GLOBAL WARMING...........................................5 2.1 CARBON CYCLE …………………..............................................................................................6 3.0 EFFORTS OF VARIOUS GOVERNMENTS IN DEVELOPING ROADMAPS FOR LOW CARBON ENERGY REVOLUTION…………..………………………………………….....7 3.1: KYOTO PROTOCOL………………………………………………………………….11 3.2: ASSISTANCE FOR DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN BALANCING ENERGY, ENVIRONMENTAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT…………………………….12 3.3: MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENTAL GOALS 7 & 8……………………………..…12 4.0 EXAMINING THE INCREASING ROLE OF LOW- OR NO-CARBON TECHNOLOGIES……………………………………………………………………………………15 4.1: NATURAL GAS…………………………………………………………………………15 4.2: WIND ENERGY…………………………………………………………………………16 4.3: SOLAR……………………………………………………………………………………17 4.4: HYDROELECTRIC………………………………………………………………….….18 4.5: NUCLEAR…………………………………………………………………………….….20 5.0 THE FUTURE OF SUSTAINABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES……………………….…..21 5.1: ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS…………………………………………………….…21 5.2: CLEAN ENERGY FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS……………………………….…21 CONCLUSION………………………………………………………………………………………....22 REFERENCES…………………………………………………………………………………………24 APPENDIX……………………………………………………………………………………………..29 Executive Summary

It seems like everywhere one turns recently, energy issues are headlining the media: there is continued coverage of the energy and environmental implications of oil spills, coal extraction techniques, fossil fuel use; debates revolving around the need to pass clean energy legislation; and the linkages between energy and climate policy, both domestically and internationally. More and more, the context of energy issues is crossing geographical and political boundaries to include the multiple, and oftentimes complicated facets of global energy supply. The need to attempt to engage collaboratively regarding global energy use is a critical issue as debates ensue within and between developed and developing countries regarding how to provide sustainable, low-carbon energy resources while meeting the demands for quality of life and economic growth. Examining the idea of utilizing and implementing renewable energy sources could not only help rebuild world economies, but lessen the human impact on our shared environmental systems. The key to a sustainable, low-carbon environment for the achievement of the eight Millennium Development Goals agreed upon by developed and developing nations in September, 2000, is renewable energy. Renewable energy is a term that one could possibly define as those energy sources generated from natural sources. The document will consider a wide range of low carbon energy alternatives, including natural gas from shale deposits, wind energy, solar energy, hydroelectric energy, and nuclear energy. It is also an attempt to study the broader context of global energy use and moving towards a low-carbon future by examining five major areas: the role of carbon in global warming, the efforts of various governments to develop potential roadmaps for lower carbon energy revolution research development and deployment of low carbon technologies, the increasing role of unconventional low, or no carbon energy supplies, and the future of sustainable energy technologies. Introduction

We flip a switch and, without thinking much about the source, take advantage of the energy that lights our homes, power our computers, and operate equipment at manufacturing and industrial factories. History has shown that the availability of affordable and reliable energy is essential for social and economic advancement. Our love affair with all things electronic-including energy consuming appliances, iPods, and high definition televisions-is...

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Appendix
Figure 2: World Coal Consumption Trends
Source: Energy Information Administration/International Energy Outlook, 2001
Source: Lenntech, 2011
Figure 7: Shale Gas Regions
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