Gerstmann's Syndrome Analysis

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History of Gerstmann’s Syndrome
Gerstmann’s syndrome is a cognitive impairment that is caused by damage to the left parietal lobe in the region of the angular gyrus. Additionally, it can occur as a result of a stroke or tumor. According to the National Institute of Health, Gerstmann’s syndrome is named after famed neuropsychiatrist Josef Gerstmann (2008). It affects both men and women in equal numbers (NORD.org, 2014).
It is characterized by four primary symptoms: a writing disability (agraphia or dysgraphia), a lack of understanding of the rules for calculation or arithmetic (acalculia or dyscalculia), an inability to distinguish right from left, and an inability to identify fingers (finger agnosia). It can sometimes involve aphasia (difficulties
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If caused by a tumor or injury, surgery may be conducted to alleviate the condition. Additionally, there are several treatments to minimize the symptoms. Agraphia can be treated by speech and occupational therapies. In addition, word processors or electronic spellers also aid in coping with the deficits. Acalculia is managed by employing the use of a calculator.
Those that suffer with Gerstmann’s syndrome often require psychological services to cope with the disorder. Patients as well as their families benefit from supportive counseling that provides encouragement through coping with frustration over loss of skills, provides an outlet for their frustrations, and informs families how they can support their loved one. Prognosis
In adults, many symptoms of Gerstmann’s syndrome will diminish over time (source me). However, symptoms often do not diminish for Children. Rather, it is more common that children learn to adjust to their deficits and incorporate them in their daily life.
Gerstmann’s syndrome, though there is currently no cure, can be treated both through speech and occupational therapies. Those that suffer with Gerstmann’s syndrome can rely on aids to help overcome their deficits, such as using word processors or

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