Genocide in Mexico

Best Essays
Topics: Mexico
Blake Hardnett
Mrs. Douglass
18 January 2010
Genocide in Mexico This paper explores incidents of genocide that occurred in Mexico from 1945 to 2001. Research focuses on four main episodes of genocide: the October 2, 1968 massacre in Tlatelolco; the Corpus Christi massacre on June 10, 1971; and Mexico’s Dirty War that occurred from the early 1970’s through the 1980’s; and the genocide of women that has been occurring since the Dirty War. Research indicates that the first three episodes of genocide were the responsibility of corrupt government leaders and the army and police that carried out the genocide under government orders (Krauze 725-752). Luis Echeverria, a leading figure in the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) during the 1960’s and Mexico’s president from 1970 to 1976, was charged with genocide related to these events in 2004. However, the charges were dropped due to a judge ruling that the events took place too long ago (BBC 1). The fourth episode of genocide against women is due to the drug cartels and the corrupt government officials that are involved in crime in Mexico (Ramirez 1-2).
From 1945 to 1964, Mexico was booming and prosperous because the Second World War had just ended and modernization and industrialization were priorities for the three Mexican presidents during those years. The presidents in office from 1946 until 1964 were Miguel Aleman, Adolfo Ruiz Cortines and Adolfo Lopez Mateos. During this time, Mexico had good relations with the United States. Many new millionaires emerged as a result of the industrialization. However, society was split into two different classes—the very poor, and the very rich people with the mansions and yachts. Corruption had seeped into the government administration, especially under Aleman. The industrialization and government priorities resulted in low wages for the working class, inferior schools, unskilled labor and little hope for improvement for the very poor. In addition, a

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