Gender Equality in the classroom

Topics: Gender, Gender role / Pages: 12 (2994 words) / Published: Feb 1st, 2014
Gender Equality in the Classroom
"Both males and females encounter gender expectations and pressures in schools from kindergarten through graduate and professional school." (Wood, 2013) We know how gender stereotyping can begin the moment parents find out the sex of their child. It is basically a cultural habit to give a boy a toy car and a girl a doll. This kick starts the gender stereotypes into gear and thus begins the thought process of what is deemed normal for girls and boys, both in their social and educational lives.
Inequality, of gender, in the classroom is believed to be slowly decreasing but this is still an issue in our culture. Our laws, which were enacted many years ago, were put in place to prevent inequality in our schools, but this cannot remold culture 's views on what is right for a boy or a girl. Research shows there have been changes put in place for equality, but our teachers, parents and schools need to work harder in providing an unbiased education to our children.
Teacher 's attitudes can affect gender differences in the way they communicate to a girl or a boy in their classroom. "Researchers have found that teachers interact differently with students of similar gender than they do with students of opposite gender. This includes evidence suggesting disciplinary procedures and proclivity to discipline vary by both student and teacher gender. Likewise, a teacher 's perception of student characteristics and abilities appear to systematically vary by gender." (Krieg, 2005)
Rationale
When looking at equality in our schools, this type of equality is based on each individual 's understanding in what the differences are in a boy and girl 's experiences in education and the influence on expectations and behaviors of both genders. Teachers feel they are providing a quality education, but may not realize they are transferring their thoughts of what they students should be accomplishing based on gender.
Great differences can be found in



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