Futurism

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Topics: Futurism
Filippo Marinetti

The Italian writer Filippo tomas Marinetti (1876-1944) founded the Futurist movement in 1909 and like many other movements of the early twentieth century it was born from a publication. Marinetti published his “Founding Manifesto” in “Le Figaro”, a French newspaper, on 20th Feb. 1909. It documented Futurism’s ideology with a desire to create a new perspective.

Futurism glorified contemporary concepts, speed, technology and modernization.
It embraced virtually every artistic medium from painting and sculpture to performance and film.
Two of the key elements considered in the movement were time and space – there was a tension between the future and the past but the primary focus was the futuristic present and, of course, the future to come.

Photography and Film
A photograph extracts and captures a moment, which essentially is forever the past – an ideology that the Futurist wanted to reject.
Photodynamism was the idea of achieving limits unattained through film or photography as isolated movements, their new way of seeing produced futuristic images and opened up the future possibilities for the medium.
Bonaventura rejected the mimetic elements of photography in favour of capturing the essence of movement as seen in the photo opposite.

Gustavo Bonaventura
Bonaventura rejected the elements of photography in favour of capturing the essence of movement. Through experimenting with photography films sensitivity, Bonaventura and his contemporaries were able to create an image no longer embalmed in time – they now had a succession of synthesized movements in one image.
Film was perhaps a more ideal medium for the futurists as it allowed the effect of creating a timeline through the present, as a fusion between art and technology it had a privileged relationship to movement that photography did not. The process of editing film too allowed for time and movement to be controlled which linked back to the ideologies of Marinetti in the first

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