From "Rp" to "Estuary English"

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From "RP" to "Estuary English":
The concept 'received ' and the debate about British pronunciation standards

Hamburg 1998

Author: Gudrun Parsons Beckstrasse 8 D-20357 Hamburg e-mail: Parsons@public.uni-hamburg.de

Table of Contents
Foreword ................................................................................................. i List of Abbreviations ............................................................................... ii 0. 1. Introduction ....................................................................................1 Received Pronunciation .................................................................5 1.1. The History of 'RP ' ..................................................................5 1.2. The History of RP....................................................................9 1.3. Descriptions of RP ...............................................................14 1.4. Summary...............................................................................17 2. Change and Variation in RP.............................................................18 2.1. The Vowel System ................................................................18 2.1.1. Diphthongisation of Long Vowels ..................................18 2.1.2. Fronting of /!/ and Lowering of /"/................................21 2.2. The Consonant System ........................................................23 2.2.1. The Glottal Stop.............................................................23 2.2.2. Vocalisation of [#]...........................................................26 2.2.3. Realisation of /r/.............................................................27 2.3. Other Phenomena ................................................................29 2.3.1. Yod Coalescence...........................................................29 2.3.2. Unrounding of /!"...........................................................30 2.4. Speech Dynamics



References: EUSTACE 1967: Eustace, S.S. 'Present Changes in English Pronunciation '. In Hála, Bohuslav, Milan Romportl & Prfemysl Janota (edd.). Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences. Prague: Academia, 1970: 303-306.

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