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Freedom And Revolution Thomas Paine

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Freedom And Revolution Thomas Paine
Freedom and Revolution

American society, since the beginning, has always been built around the strength of one word; Freedom. Yet, somehow, “freedom” always seems to fall short of its whole significance.
Throughout the semester, we learned about women's rights, slavery, male dominance, religion, Native Americans, and government; besides the fact that all of these topics were distinctive in their own lessons, one theme that I observed within them was the idea of revolution. Every event within American history could show that it was surely manifested out of a little bit of revolutionary thinking and a hint of rebellion. While these two words frequently hold negative connotations, the act them are usually to better of the society as a whole.
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At this time, America had not formed its own government yet and Paine writes to revolutionize towards freedom from Britain. He writes about all the mistakes and calamities that Britain has made so far and why America needs to understand why they need to fight for independence. This is were freedom and revolution first meet, and a good example where you can see why you can’t have one without the other. He tries to appeal to his audience by explaining that if they fight for their freedom, other countries will follow in their footsteps. Then once this happens, the public can form a government to fit their own countries needs. One of these needs is the introduction of a democracy. Paine believed that the best form of government is a government formed by the choice of the people; unlike Britain, who was in rule under a king. Another one of these needs was alliances with other countries, which they couldn’t form under a parent country. Paine wasn't oblivious to the effort that it would take in order for America to gain its own title. He admitted openly that it would take men and for men to be lost to win a war, nonetheless, he did say that the men who didn't want to secede were cowards, but revolution isn’t a revolution without people pushing against you. Paine, arguably one of America's first rebels, in “Common Sense” constructed the idea of rebelling against the British government in pursuance of American

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