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Fredrick Douglass

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Fredrick Douglass
Fredrick Douglass
Literacy is an important aspect of Fredrick Douglass’ life. We see many instances where he is either trying to read and write, or teaching others to read and write. Initially, he learns to read and write from his first master’s wife. His reading and comprehension improves through the reading of the book “Columbian Oracle”. His knowledge increases even more when a white man named Mr. Wilson teaches Fredrick about the Bible. This sparks interest in religion for Fredrick. After learning about the Bible, he uses this source to teach children about literacy and religion.
From the very beginning of Fredrick Douglass’ life, he had a yearning to be able to read and write, but it was not until he was seven that he received his chance to learn. In 1826, his master’s wife, Sophia Auld, taught him the ABC’s and how to spell. Fredrick states, “Very soon after I went to live with Mr. and Mrs. Auld, she very kindly commenced to teach me the A, B, C. After I
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Freeland, and educated gentleman that was a kind slave owner. Fredrick worked on a farm with a few other hired hands, and two slaves. During his time there Fredrick obtained some old spelling books, which he used to teach the other slaves how to read and write. Fredrick says “I succeeded in creating in them a strong desire to learn how to read. This desire soon sprang up in others also.” (Douglass 94). As word spread about his teaching, other slaves came to him to learn. He saw his knowledge of being able to read and write as a means of finding his own freedom.
In the book, Narrative of the Life of Fredrick Douglass, the reader sees and feels the struggle that Fredrick had to learn to read and write. Literacy is one of the things that made him stand out from other slaves. When he read books like “The Columbian Orator” he realized just what it meant to be free. The story of other slave’s struggles to be free gave him the courage to seek his own freedom once and for

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