Frederick Douglass: A Slaveholder or a Christian?

Topics: Slavery in the United States, Slavery, Christianity Pages: 1 (352 words) Published: January 21, 2014
Madison Summers
October 19, 2013
Period 1
Words: 354
Question 6: Frederick Douglass

A Christian is in no way an accurate name for a slaveholder. The name is in fact ironic. The Christian faith calls for freedom, respect, and kindness for every creature God has created. It is not justice for a “Christian” to treat another human or any living thing in such a cruel manner. Douglass makes a distinction between “true” and “false” christianity. Slaveholders are “false” christians because they do not execute justice for all of God’s creations. A “true” christian would not advocate for slavery because it goes against their Gods teachings. A “Christian” slaveholder in truth can not exist. Slave owners also committed sins such as adultery, which is how Douglass was born. They were hypocrites that claimed to be part of a just society and religion, but could not carry out their actions in such a manner. Douglass describes how white slave owners would send their most defiant and unruly slaves to Edward Coveys plantation. Douglass describes his own experience on Covey’s plantation. Slaves were sent there to learn a lesson, and to be “broken”. Covey would make them take care of the horses he had. The slave had to keep the horse healthy, clean and happy at all times. If the slave did not do the work to Coveys liking, the slave would get whipped. Covey also committed adultery. He tries to “break” the slaves in a sense that they will feel like they are not worth more than a horses life, and they will forever be but a tool to white folk. The slave is “broken” when he or she has no spirit, cheerfulness, or motive. Covey tries to pass himself as a pious man, a man who has a strong faith and belief in his religion, christian. But this is a defective adjective to use to describe him because he commits sins every day! Every person sins. But not every person commits the same sin over and over and tries to pass it as “normal” or “just”. That is the cruel and wicked part of his...
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