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Frederick Douglass Treatment Of Slaves

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Frederick Douglass Treatment Of Slaves
This was a heartbreaking and difficult to read essay written by Frederick Douglass on the treatment of slaves in early American history. Mr. Douglass was a slave to a very cruel man, one who would hardly give any sympathy or forgiving nature to the people working under him. Douglass describes how there was hardly enough food given to feed all the people and that he was left to be begging for food. At the same time Auld, the owner, and his wife were praising God and asking him for blessings. Auld would use religion as an excuse and reason to abuse his slaves, and abuse them he did. Without consistency in rules or desires, it was impossible for the slaves to know what to do and judge the reactions they would receive. Such an ambivalent behavior

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