Fred Shuttlesworth's Argument Against Segregation

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Alabama, where my wife and I moved, was one of the most segregated cities in America.

A woman named Rosa Parks got arrested for refusing to give her bus seat to a white man. I thought things were going too far! Therefore, I organised a boycott. Nearly all Black Americans didn’t ride the bus for one year. We were victorious in 1956 when the supreme court decision restricted all segregated buses.
A big influence that made me want to stop the American segregation was that when my friend, Fred Shuttlesworth didn’t believe the rules and policies of the country. His house and church were bombed and he was thrown in jail. That is when he contacted me and I moved to the town. I had a strategy to face the government with non-violent strategies such

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