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Frankenstein Vs Film Essay

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Frankenstein Vs Film Essay
Frankenstein, an enthralling novel by Mary Shelly, is a clever collaboration of some of the most pressing themes in literature. Almost every person knows the story through the equally riveting Hollywood renditions of the popular tale. However, the story is sensationalized from the novel to portray a mad professor who creates a rampaging monster, as opposed to an ordinary man so preoccupied with scientific advances that he does not think about the consequences of his actions. This exaggeration is a tribute to America’s movie industry, whose success rate thrives on its ability to capitalize on popular stories that the general public has always associated with. Within the last 100 years, Hollywood has created more than 20 adaptations of the well-known science-fiction story (www.english.upenn.edu/Projects/knarf/Pop/filmlist.html). The many editions of this particular …show more content…
Digital media has revolutionized into an escalating commercial business, with competition between media tycoons to be the first producers of a film with the latest technology. With the advance and formation of newer equipment, stories have been reformatted to include the more novel, astounding special effects. With the movie Frankenstein itself; when it first came out in 1910, it was a mute, black-and-white phenomenon. 21 years later, voice technology was the reason for Frankenstein to resurface. Yet again, in 1994, once high-quality colour films and famous actors could be used, the movie was once again “revived.” One common thing, however, is the difference between all the screenplays of the movies. With the arrival of new gadgets in the media industry, the focus has digressed from the story of the movie to the special effects. Soon enough, with all the recent discoveries and developments, we may lose the significance of the lifeline of a film – the

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