Food Sustainability

Topics: Agriculture, Sustainability, Famine Pages: 5 (1581 words) Published: June 19, 2013
ty Running Head: FOOD SUSTAINABILITY 1

Running Head: FOOD SUSTAINABILITY 1

WRT 1020 00 07
6 February 2013
b

WRT 1020 00 07
6 February 2013
b

Amanda Rowley
Food Sustainability has grown to be an important issue, affecting all parts of the world. In this essay I will be discussing the meaning of food sustainability, how nations become unsustainable, and a few proposed solutions as stated by credible philosophers and authors. I will be examining different effects of food insecurity throughout different countries as well as right here in the United States. These examinations will hopefully conclude an overlying cause for food insecurity, which can then lead to a solution. By researching multiple approaches already existing, I can better determine what has worked verses what not. Amanda Rowley

Food Sustainability has grown to be an important issue, affecting all parts of the world. In this essay I will be discussing the meaning of food sustainability, how nations become unsustainable, and a few proposed solutions as stated by credible philosophers and authors. I will be examining different effects of food insecurity throughout different countries as well as right here in the United States. These examinations will hopefully conclude an overlying cause for food insecurity, which can then lead to a solution. By researching multiple approaches already existing, I can better determine what has worked verses what not. Food Sustainability: The Rising Impact

Food Sustainability: The Rising Impact

Food sustainability, on a worldwide scale, has become an increasingly large issue thus making it important. Often linked with poverty, unsustainable food environments are most evident in third-world countries such as Haiti and Ethiopia. While those countries are well known for their poverty and collapsing economy, many cities in the United States suffer, too. Research has concluded that most commonly, food insecurity is caused not by lack of food within the nation, but faulty food distribution systems. Since industrialization many nations have adopted a market economy allowing citizens to purchase most of their food rather than relying on self-grown crops. This market economy seems to work well within the United States but poverty and famine have been a result. By evaluating the sustainability of communities in relation to food and poverty, hopefully we can determine the reasons for food insecurity throughout the world and then work toward solving this terrible issue. Sustainable food consumption refers to “obtaining and consuming sufficient amounts of nutritious and safe food to stay healthy and active as well as dealing responsibly with issues of resources, emissions and waste”(Reisch, 2010). According to the British Commission on Sustainable Development, sustainable food systems must always produce safe and healthy food, utilize natural resources with respect, support the diversity of urban and rural communities, assure a safe work environment and achieve high quality in food production. These standards are a clear guideline for healthy sustainable food systems worldwide. But due to the greater use of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, and technology, food companies are becoming more concerned with profits rather than well-being. (Reisch, 2010) Farmers especially have suffered from this globalized, technological food distribution and production. Their crops are sold to large, complex marketing chains for less than half of the price they should be making. Damburu Behera (2013), a maize farmer in the Nabarangpur district of India, expresses his concerns as well as the concerns of many local farmers of the inadequate pricing of their crops. Behera says, “We are facing a lot of difficulty...

References: Anderson, J. (2012, February 1). The Monsanto Monopoly. In Be Green. Retrieved February 6, 2013
Behera, D. Behera, D. (Narrator). (2013). Maize Farmers Suffer in Maoist hit Odish [Online video]. Retrieved February 6, 2013
Braun, J., Teklu, T., & Webb, P. (1993). Famine as the Outcome of Political Production and Market Failures. Third World Quarterly, 24(4), 73-76.
Koc, M. (1999). For Hunger-Proof Cities: Sustainable Urban Food Systems. In E. M. Power (Ed.), Combing Social Justice and Sustainabilty for Food Security (pp. 30-34). N.p.: Development Research Centre.
Reisch, L. A. (2010). Sustainable Food Systems. In Corpus: The SCP Knowledge Hub . Retrieved February 6, 2013
Rottenberg, A. T., & Winchell, D. H. (2012). Elements of Argument (Tenth ed., ). In S. Astyk & A. Newton (Eds.), The Rich Get Richer, the Poor Go Hungry (pp. 580-582). Boston, NY: Bedford/St. Martin 's.
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