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Topics: The Office, Ricky Gervais, Stephen Merchant Pages: 19 (6825 words) Published: October 20, 2014
The Office (especially the British version, with Ricky Gervais instead of Steve Carell). Great – because that’s Willy Loman in a nutshell. He’s delusional, thinks everyone loves him, and is depressing in an "I’m manifesting everyone’s fears about obsession with material success" kind of way.

But now that we’ve gotten a flashy pop culture reference out of the way, let’s get to the bigger picture. Death of a Salesman is often considered an attack on the American Dream. Sound familiar? In 2004, surveys found one-third of Americans adamantly insisting they were not living the American Dream, with half of them saying it wasn’t even attainabl The Office (especially the British version, with Ricky Gervais instead of Steve Carell). Great – because that’s Willy Loman in a nutshell. He’s delusional, thinks everyone loves him, and is depressing in an "I’m manifesting everyone’s fears about obsession with material success" kind of way.

But now that we’ve gotten a flashy pop culture reference out of the way, let’s get to the bigger picture. Death of a Salesman is often considered an attack on the American Dream. Sound familiar? In 2004, surveys found one-third of Americans adamantly insisting they were not living the American Dream, with half of them saying it wasn’t even attainabl The Office (especially the British version, with Ricky Gervais instead of Steve Carell). Great – because that’s Willy Loman in a nutshell. He’s delusional, thinks everyone loves him, and is depressing in an "I’m manifesting everyone’s fears about obsession with material success" kind of way.

But now that we’ve gotten a flashy pop culture reference out of the way, let’s get to the bigger picture. Death of a Salesman is often considered an attack on the American Dream. Sound familiar? In 2004, surveys found one-third of Americans adamantly insisting they were not living the American Dream, with half of them saying it wasn’t even attainabl The Office (especially the British version, with Ricky Gervais instead of Steve Carell). Great – because that’s Willy Loman in a nutshell. He’s delusional, thinks everyone loves him, and is depressing in an "I’m manifesting everyone’s fears about obsession with material success" kind of way.

But now that we’ve gotten a flashy pop culture reference out of the way, let’s get to the bigger picture. Death of a Salesman is often considered an attack on the American Dream. Sound familiar? In 2004, surveys found one-third of Americans adamantly insisting they were not living the American Dream, with half of them saying it wasn’t even attainabl The Office (especially the British version, with Ricky Gervais instead of Steve Carell). Great – because that’s Willy Loman in a nutshell. He’s delusional, thinks everyone loves him, and is depressing in an "I’m manifesting everyone’s fears about obsession with material success" kind of way.

But now that we’ve gotten a flashy pop culture reference out of the way, let’s get to the bigger picture. Death of a Salesman is often considered an attack on the American Dream. Sound familiar? In 2004, surveys found one-third of Americans adamantly insisting they were not living the American Dream, with half of them saying it wasn’t even attainabl The Office (especially the British version, with Ricky Gervais instead of Steve Carell). Great – because that’s Willy Loman in a nutshell. He’s delusional, thinks everyone loves him, and is depressing in an "I’m manifesting everyone’s fears about obsession with material success" kind of way.

But now that we’ve gotten a flashy pop culture reference out of the way, let’s get to the bigger picture. Death of a Salesman is often considered an attack on the American Dream. Sound familiar? In 2004, surveys found one-third of Americans adamantly insisting they were not living the American Dream, with half of them saying it wasn’t even attainabl The Office (especially the British version, with Ricky Gervais instead of Steve Carell). Great –...
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