Finall Essay

Topics: Robert Frost, Leaf, Translation Pages: 5 (1530 words) Published: April 14, 2015
Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American Poet. He is highly regarded for his realistic depictions of rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. “Nothing Gold Can Stay” is a short poem that was written in 1923. The poem read as both the rose’s blossom, as well as its sharpest thorn. Although the poem seems to be about the nature, there is an obvious connection to human beings. The poem shows common to youth in nature, the early theological beginning of man and the passing of each day. Frost’s poem focuses on the concept of mankind’s blossoming potentials and of the inevitable downfall or decay. Frost gives no consolation for the “grief” suffered after this decay, but merely states the fact of its occurrence. Anonymous blogger creates an interesting interpretation of the poem and builds upon some widely held notions that the poem reminds us “to hold on to [our] innocence, stay true to [ourselves] and maintain [our] youth” for as long as we are able (“Stay gold, Ponyboy). The poem has been interpreted in the novel ‘The Outsiders’ too. In the poem “Nothing Gold Can Stay” Robert Frost creates a seasons of one’s life, picturesque, vivid and describe the year passing as the colors do with time. The poem is only eight lines long, but it possesses some powerful thoughts. Frost writes about how hard it is to hold onto youth and quickly time flies by after only flowering from an hour. Kearney and Donald Freeman supports the Robert Frost poem through articles. In first four lines, Frost disclose the beauty of world and makes us believe of trees like the willow, which are golden early in spring, before they cultured to green. Gold in poem especially represents the temporary sparkle of new life of leaf and also talks of anything we hold valuable in life. The poem set the image of human comparison to the seasons of natural world. The full concept of nature in the poem is the belief of it having a first green, both the green leafs on trees and other plants or premature youth of the individual. Somewhat Frost describes a child can’t be a child forever, ever body’s grown up sooner or later, when it is said that it can hold onto the hue of gold. Frost also describes that childhood is the only phase of human life that everyone wants to live for, they don’t want to get old. Similar to the leaf’s they don’t want to fade and fall. “Her early leaf’s a flower” rein forces the passage of time (Frost l.3). Frost this line gets narrates with what he was talking in line 1. The ‘first green’ of the first line becomes ‘early leaf’ just like nature’s first green is gold, her first leaf is a flower. Also, this early leaf represent the first leaf to grow from the branches of trees as spring arrives and bushes bloom with gorgeous flower and then being replaced by green leafs in the summer or the first symbols of a young person entering elder lines. “But only so an hour,” sensation that first kind of the leaf is the flower which doesn’t last very long (Frost l.4). Frost relate this line with when the sun appears up, everything is flourishing and flower is blooming, but when the sun arise high in the sky, everything get turns into its normal color, which once looked like golden flower, what they truly look like is green leaf. The message remains that this beautiful blossoming flower with great potential cannot last very long.

The poem diverts the mind of the reader in a second half, it expose the outcome of the nature’s descent from green to gold. Frost goes on to say then “leaf subsides to leaf” which impose the frame of its significance (Frost l.5). This line revels what happens after the early leaf. The early leaf is no longer a premature leaf, it fall down or descent to become another leaf. For instant, early leaf in the morning is much prettier than the leaf at midday. It demonstrates the decompose of leaf, which was pure and precious as gold in its primitive time of existence. Here, Frost justify the fall in...

Cited: Frost, Robert. “Nothing Gold can Stay.” The Norton Anthology of American Literature. Ed. Nina Baym. New York. Norton, 2007. 1708. Print.
“Stay gold, Ponyboy.” Consultant Journal.com. Web. 5 March 2015.
“The Outsiders-‘Nothing Gold can Stay.’” Online video clip. YouTube. YouTube, 3 June 2014. Web. 6 April 2015.
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