Top-Rated Free Essay

Final Roshahana

Topics: Judaism, Israel, Bible, Rosh Hashanah / Pages: 4 (1203 words) / Published: Sep 20th, 2014
Serina Harvell
Mrs. Fuller
English 2
19 November 20
Rosh Hashanah Rosh Hashanah is about giving peace, forgiveness, and hope; it is the Jewish New Year. The book Night, Rosh Hashanah is a cursed year. It is between “life and death”. It’s referred to one of the high holy days. It is the last year of the others. The word “last” had an odd ring to it. They always asked what if it is the last day of the year. Rosh Hashanah is a very important holiday, It is where everyone comes together to pour out there sins, and ask for forgiveness for their peers. It’s a time where everyone comes together and show peace and joy. It’s a time where God will decide if they are going to live or die that next year.
Jews embark upon the task of examining their lives and repenting for their sins that they have made. Jews are encouraged to make amend with anyone who they have hurt in the past; they have to make plans for improving during the coming year. Rosh Hashanah is all about making peace in the community and striving to be a better person.
It is a holiday that is filled with hope for the New Year. Jews believed that God is compassionate and that he will accept their prayers for forgiveness. Rosh Hashanah is a judgment day, when Jews believed that God will balance person’s good deeds over the bad deeds. It’s a time for the Jews to think about their priorities in life and to reflect on what have they achieved it. Eliezer struggles with his faith are a conflict in Night. At the beginning of the book, his faith in God is absolute. When he asked why he prays to God, and “Why did I pray? And why did I live? And why did I breathe?” His belief in God is unconditional, and he cannot imagine living without faith or a stronger power.
His faith is shaken by his experience during the Holocaust. Eliezer faith is a reaction of his studies in Jewish mysticism, which teach him that God is everywhere and anywhere in the world that nothing will exists without God. In fact everything in the physical world is an “animation,” or reflection, of the divine world.
Eliezer has grown up believing that everything on Earth reflects God’s holiness and power. His faith is grounded in the idea that God is everywhere, that his divinity touches every aspect of his daily life. God is good, and God is everywhere in the world, the world must therefore be good. Eliezer’s faith in the goodness of the world is shaken by the cruelty and evil he witnesses during the Holocaust. He cannot imagine that the concentration camps unbelievable, disgusting cruelty could possibly reflect such thought. He wonders how God could be part of such depravity and how that God could permit such cruelty to take place. His faith is equally shaken by the cruelty and selfishness he sees among the prisoners. If all the prisoners were to unite to the cruel intention of the Nazis. Eliezer believes that maybe he could understand the Nazi menace as an evil aberration. He would be able to maintain the belief that humankind is good. He sees that the Holocaust exposes the selfishness, evil, and cruelty of which everybody not only the Nazis, but also his fellow prisoners, his fellow Jews, even though he is capable. If the world is so disgusting and cruel, he feels that God either must be disgusting and cruel or must not exist at all. During his first night in the camp and during the hanging of the pipel, Eliezer does differ with his faith, but his struggle is confused with a complete abandonment of his faith. This struggle doesn’t diminish his belief in God. It is essential to the existence of that belief. When Moshe the Beadle is asked why he prays, he replies, “I pray to the God within me that He will give me the strength to ask Him the right questions.” questioning is fundamental to the idea of faith in God. We are making a mental and spiritual preparation. Rosh Hashanah talks about how “it is not the death of sinners that God seeks but they should repent.” God judges mankind; he does not judge us by our actions. Rosh Hashanah is the day that we establish God 's kingdom over us; we also define our relationship to him. Rosh Hashanah is the day that the army of God is the day that every citizen becomes a soldier. The soldier will do all that he is suppose to do without question. He understands that he will be judged according to his degree of obedience. This enlistment in the army and "mission mentality" awaken the soldier to turn his attention away from himself and toward his mission. He will no longer consider himself the focal point of his reality. His main desire is that the king 's mission be accomplished. A person who has achieved soldier consciousness also realizes that even if he has personally ascended to greater spiritual heights, the main goal is the ascent of the entire nation and of all humanity. Soldier consciousness creates the spirit of mutual responsibility, solidarity, and cooperation before God. God remembers that His nation is like an ember whose source is in the great flame of devotion of our souls to Him. When God comes to rule over us with his might, He is not coercing us to accept an artificial joke, foreign to our inner spirit. God 's rule entirely befits us, and awakens our inner spark of devotion to Him. When we assess our level of devotion to God on Rosh Hashanah, we often see that not only we have not advanced toward Gods goals, but, some of those goals have even receded into the distance. We ask God to understand our lack of devotion not as rebellion, but rather as simple laziness, and to forgive us our debts of unaccomplished goals.

Works Cited

Everyday Living : Bible Life and Times: Fascinating, Everyday Customs and Traditions from the People of the Bible. New York, N.Y: MJF Books, 2006. Print.
Higgins, Violet M, and Mabel B. Hill. A Bible Abc Book. New York: C.R. Gibson & Co, 1932. Print.
The Holy Bible Containing the Old Testament and the New: Newly Translated Out of the Original Tongues and with the Former Translations Diligently Compar 'd & Revised by His Mats Special Command Appointed to Be Read in Churches[.]. Oxon: Printed by Thomas Baskett printer to the University, 1750. Print.
Roberts, Stephen, and Willard W. C. Ashley. Disaster Spiritual Care: Practical Clergy Responses to Community, Regional, and National Tragedy. Woodstock, VT: SkyLight Paths Pub, 2008. Print.
"Rosh Hashanah - Jewish New Year | Infoplease.com." Infoplease: Encyclopedia, Almanac, Atlas, Biographies, Dictionary, Thesaurus. Free online reference, research & homework help. | Infoplease.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Nov. 2013.
"Rosh Hashanah — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts." History.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2013.
"Rosh Hashanah: History & Overview | Jewish Virtual Library." Home | Jewish Virtual Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2013.
Wiesel, Elie, and Marion Wiesel. Night. New York, NY: Hill and Wang, a division of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006. Print.

Cited: Everyday Living : Bible Life and Times: Fascinating, Everyday Customs and Traditions from the People of the Bible. New York, N.Y: MJF Books, 2006. Print. Higgins, Violet M, and Mabel B. Hill. A Bible Abc Book. New York: C.R. Gibson & Co, 1932. Print. The Holy Bible Containing the Old Testament and the New: Newly Translated Out of the Original Tongues and with the Former Translations Diligently Compar 'd & Revised by His Mats Special Command Appointed to Be Read in Churches[.]. Oxon: Printed by Thomas Baskett printer to the University, 1750. Print. Roberts, Stephen, and Willard W. C. Ashley. Disaster Spiritual Care: Practical Clergy Responses to Community, Regional, and National Tragedy. Woodstock, VT: SkyLight Paths Pub, 2008. Print. "Rosh Hashanah - Jewish New Year | Infoplease.com." Infoplease: Encyclopedia, Almanac, Atlas, Biographies, Dictionary, Thesaurus. Free online reference, research & homework help. | Infoplease.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Nov. 2013. "Rosh Hashanah — History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts." History.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. "Rosh Hashanah: History & Overview | Jewish Virtual Library." Home | Jewish Virtual Library. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 Nov. 2013. Wiesel, Elie, and Marion Wiesel. Night. New York, NY: Hill and Wang, a division of Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006. Print.

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