Feminism Liberal Feminism

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RALE ÇELEBİ
İZMİR UNIVERSITY OF ECONOMICS
20110105008
SOCIOLOGY

SUBMITTED TO:
SOC 201
10 /01/ 2014
INTRODUCTION
From the early days until now, women are exploited in their daily life especially by the labor market. In this paper, we are going to see how women are exploited in the labor market. Exploitation of women is a social fact in the world, so I chose this topic because it started to be a social problem after the Second World War period and Industrial Revolution. In the Second World War, most of our women faced many problems by participating and aiding the men. Actually, if we go back in time, we can see the gender-based division of labor typical of hunting and gathering societies. For example, most forms of farming were characterized by a distinction between ‘‘men’s work’’ and ‘‘women’s work.’’ In horticulture, the chief task for men was to clear the land. After this was done, women performed the more time-consuming tasks of planting, weeding, and harvesting. As with economies based on hunting and gathering, economies depend on horticulture were much more affiliated to the labor of women than the productive activities of men. Men, however, took on a larger role when horticulture gave way to agriculture. Also, in prehistory, women have always worked as hard as men to support their families and build the cultures that dominated the ancient world. During the early Stone Age, when humans first appeared and lived in hunting and gathering, most of scientists support that women did most of the gathering while men did most of the hunting. Women always took part up to now. Thus, women in the ancient world worked hard. They were always overwhelmingly responsible for care of children and their ill, for providing food, and clothing for the household. In addition, most women took on the duties of bringing in some income for family or working in the family businesses. These facts remained constant. What did change over time



References: 1. Salisbury, J. E. (2001) ‘‘Encyclopedia of Women In The Ancient World’’ 2 3. Binder, C. & Richmann N. (2000) ‘‘Feminist Movements in Turkey’’ 4 5. Shaw, S. M. & Lee, J. (2012) ‘‘ Women’s Voices, Feminist Visions: classic and contemporary readings ’’(5. Edition) 6 7. Brewer, P. (2004) ‘‘Frederick Engels: The Origin of The Family, Private Property, and the State’’ from http://readingfromtheleft.com/PDF/EngelsOrigin.pdf 8 9. Knaus, K. (2007) ‘‘ Turkish Women: A Century Of Change ’’ 10 11. Freedman, J. (2001) ‘‘ Feminism’’ Open University Press 12

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