Federalists vs Democratic Republicans

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Republican side As new problems arose facing the new nation, many different views toward the new conflicts developed. Initially, Hamilton acted aggressively to deal with the new republic's financial troubles with proposals to fund the national debt, create a central banking system and uniform currency, and promote manufacturing with a high protective tariff. Jefferson opposed these policies, objecting to the concentration of power in the hands of bankers and currency speculators. Jefferson believed that an economy dominated by small farmers, not manufacturers, would best preserve republican values. Hamilton believed in a strong central government while Jefferson believed in States’ Rights. Hamilton believed, “United States becoming a commercial and industrial empire, a world power remarkable for its ability to balance individual freedom with government power” (Tindall). Jefferson believed that an agriculture based society would better protect the civil liberties of the Americans. He feared that the growth of cities would enrich the aristocracy and widen divisions between the rich and poor, just as it has today. As the presidential election of 1800 approached, many people realized that Federalist policies became a failure or favored very little. The passing of the Alien and Sedition Acts, the Judiciary Act of 1801, Whiskey Rebellion, Jay’s Treaty, and Hamilton’s economic programs all led to the revolution of 1800 that was deserved. The Federalists’ decision to approach these problems proved to be unfavorable and unjust. The Alien and Sedition acts, for example, were meant to punish republicans but it also suppressed the freedom of speech to Americans. Matthew Lyon of Vermont talked about John Adams’s “continual grasp for power” and “Unbounded thirst for ridiculous pomp, foolish adulation, and selfish avarice” (Tindall) and he got fined $1,000 and imprisoned for four months. Republicans, however, believed in liberty and would never suppress the rights of the

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