Exploring The Absolute In Kant's Argument

Good Essays
Lord Krishna lays down two important requirements for a person to understand the most secret knowledge about the God, namely the uncarping spirit, and the faith. The absence of cavil, or the uncarping spirit is a prerequisite for gaining an intimate, immediate and personal experience of the omnipresent reality of the absolute. Every spiritual aspirant must necessarily cultivate this quality. It is a divine characteristic, which makes a man's personality pure and lucent.
Carping nature is a big obstacle in the path to divinity, acquire mental equipoise and inner tranquillity. People, today, waste all their time and energy in blaming others without realizing that to search for and find faults in others is the most grievous and ghastly sin. Sometimes there is an argument
…show more content…
The true nature of the God is absolute consciousness, which is beyond sensory perception. Knowledge about the absolute is therefore one such issue, which cannot be explored based on knowledge gained through the senses. Mastery over the senses is required as the senses distort our view and veil the true reality. As famous philosopher Immanuel Kant said “man is blind, because he has eyes—deaf, because he has ears—deluded, because he has a mind—and the things he perceives do not exist, because he perceives them”. The argument rest upon the premise that any knowledge based on the information gained through sensory perceptions cannot correspond to the facts of reality, since it gets coloured through the senses. Since reason, logic, and science, based on sensory perceptions are denied access to the reality of the God, the door is open for men to approach reality from a different, so called non-rational method of faith. Faith is the only way to reach the absolute reality, it becomes difficult to obtain sovereign knowledge about the absolute reality by an ignorant, faithless, and a doubting

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Immanuel Kant and Blaise Pascal offer contrasting opinions concerning reason, or man’s ability to come to conclusions on his own. In Metaphysics of Morals, Kant provides an optimistic view of reason, depicting that reason can attain certain conclusions. Pascal argues in Pensees that man is inherently flawed and can’t be certain from reasoning while faith, or belief in the supernatural, is the only thing that can create certainty. Kant’s positive outlook on human reason is a sound assertion, although it doesn’t necessarily create a rupture between faith and reason, because despite reason’s capabilities of reaching universal truths, faith compensates for potential mishaps made by reason and provides a more in depth knowledge when combined with…

    • 1097 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Against this motion, my first argument is the ‘argument from degree – there must exist a being that possesses all properties to the maximum possible degree’. This suggests that God is omnipotent and he is also described as being omnipresent, omniscient, omnibenevolent, omnipresent, and immanent. These describe the attributes God has. In the Bible God for example is described as a father, king, judge and a warrior so we know his nature, therefore we can say that God is not cruel and is not bad etc. This is yet another way of knowing what God is like. In Genesis the first chapter of the bible there is the Creation story, saying that we humans were created in his image so we can understand him. For example it could be argued that miracles are another way of experiencing God and praying. There are Christians who believe that there is a way of knowing what God is like because Jesus was born on Earth his son and he died to save the world from sin, that…

    • 432 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Kant states that objects of belief are based on a priori reasoning, that the idea of a maximally great and omnipotent God is an a priori idea about a supersensible reality in the world of the noumena. A priori elements of cognition are innate to reason, whereas a posteriori elements are derived from sense, and he argues that both are equally crucial for knowledge. A priori perceptions and concepts also provide some a priori knowledge. For something to become an object of knowledge, it must be experienced, primarily, as Kant argues, by the senses. He concludes that it is impossible to prove the truth about God or any other supersensible concept such as the immortality of the soul or the freedom of the will which belong to the world of the noumena as theses supersensible concepts are matters of faith and therefore objects of belief – it is a common error to employ a priori reason beyond the domain of the senses and beyond the facts of empirical knowledge. God is not a fact, as facts are given by empirical knowledge, observation and the…

    • 953 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Kant published the Critique of Pure Reason in 1781. Kant’s goal was to determine the limits of pure reason which means that he wants to know what reason alone can determine without the help of the senses or any other faculties. Kant is encouraged by Hume’s skepticism to doubt metaphysics existence. Kant makes a differentiation between priori and posteriori knowledge and between analytic and synthetic judgments. A posteriori knowledge is knowledge from experience and a priori knowledge is the necessary and universal knowledge we have independent of experience, such as our knowledge of mathematics. In an analytic judgment, the concept in the predicate is contained in the concept in the subject, as, for instance, in the judgment, “a bachelor…

    • 944 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Immanuel Kant Analysis

    • 472 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Immanuel Kant is a philosopher that has always stuck out because the way he approaches morality is particularly different than most other philosopher. Some would say that Kant’s philosophy works satisfactorily in a perfect world, but fails to account for how the world actually is, which is far from perfect. Even if this is true the groundwork of Kant’s work has still garnered the admiration of many philosophers that were during and after his time.…

    • 472 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Donovan Implications

    • 2251 Words
    • 10 Pages

    In his essay ‘Can we know God by experience?’ Peter Donovan questions whether it is possible to have direct, intuitive knowledge of God. After setting out this question, he considers the views of 20th century theologians and philosophers (like H.P. Owen) who have argued that religious experiences may provide knowledge of God, through intuition. Donovan points out how this idea of intuitive knowledge of God fits with established Christian ways of thinking: God is a personal being who acts in history. He then distinguishes psychological feelings of certainty from actually being right on logical grounds, and associates intuitive…

    • 2251 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    “The existence of God would be obvious if we weren’t distracted by life in the sensory world. And the knowledge of God saves us from doubt about other things we are certain of.”…

    • 1278 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    In order to discover what is moral or not, Kant believes that categorical imperative gives reasoning for any sort of action. In order to do so, one must think about the fundamental rule that goes in hand with what the person plans to fulfill in the first place. If a certain act can be applied to others and puts them in that exact situation, then it is moral. One concept of categorical imperative is known as “The Principle of Ends.” This theory describes individuals as worthy and valuable, depicting them as something worth more than a mere object. This pairs with the saying “treat others as you would like to be treated.” On a general status, I believe that this should be the correct thing to do. Concerning Kant, I disagree with his argument…

    • 195 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    This reading “What Is Enlightenment?”, is written by Kant. Kant claims that man does not use their own enlightenment because there are other people with higher intelligence that can make the hard decisions for them and, that, the people listening will obey. Kant supports his claim that mankind does not utilize their enlightenment because they do not have freedom, they are lazy, and cannot escape their own nonage.…

    • 820 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Anolgy of the cave

    • 385 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Some people might not agree with his views of reality as although he states we cant trust our senses, they are all we have in our lives to gain experiences and therefore reality can only be sensed through them.…

    • 385 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    The statement “God is omnipotent” raises more issues and complexities the any other three-word sentence, not least due to the disagreement over what omnipotent actually means. A long side this, numerous contradictions, incoherencies and philosophical problems arise, all of which lead me to conclude that man’s traditional conception of God is simply an impossibility.…

    • 2007 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Throughout the course of time, many philosophers, dogmatic religions and even individual human beings themselves have tried to prove the existence of God. The recurrent question that constantly arises is whether or not you can prove the existence of God solely by rational thinking alone. To that, the answer is no. It is not possible to prove the existence of God solely by rational thinking as you also need to incorporate aspects of faith, but rational thinking helps solidify your beliefs pertaining to God and leaves the answers we cannot conceive rationally up to faith. You cannot understand something outside of your existence rationally because you cannot experience it or see it; you can only theorize, believe and trust in it. You will never be able to reason what you have no knowledge of. In this essay, I will argue that in…

    • 1217 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    In ‘Can we know God by experience?’ Peter Donovan questions whether it is possible to have direct, intuitive knowledge of God. Intuition is an experiential belief characterized by its immediacy. It is direct perception or insight without any need for evidence or argument. Intuition or intuitive knowledge is the main theme of Donovan. He suggested that knowledge can be attained through intuition. Especially the claim that people who have religious experiences can gain an intuitive knowledge of God. Donovan claims that God can be known through ‘finite things’. He considers the views of 20th century theologians and philosophers who have argued that religious experiences may provide knowledge of God, through intuition.…

    • 2589 Words
    • 74 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The argument from religious experience also takes the form of an appeal to intuition (direct, immediate knowledge). In this regard, it is more of an assertion than a sophisticated, effable argument. Peter Donovan argues that we can essentially know God by religious experience, implying that experiencing God is a superior way of knowing him (intuitively) than our Reason (man’s mental capacity).…

    • 2406 Words
    • 69 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    One burning and enduring problem in philosophy to which we have given considerable examination is the question of the existence of God--the superlative being that philosophers have defined and dealt with for centuries. After reading the classic arguments of St. Anselm and St. Thomas Aquinas, the contentious assertions of Ernest Nagel, and the compelling eyewitness accounts of Julian of Norwich, I have been introduced to some of the most revered and referenced arguments for and against God's existence that have been put into text. All of them are well-thought and well-articulated arguments, but they have their holes. The question of God's true existence, therefore, is still not definitively answered and put to rest; the intensity of this debate probably never will mitigate. Many theologians and academics honestly admit that no matter what any philosopher may assert regarding this topic, whether or not a certain person believes in God's existence is a question of faith and nothing more.…

    • 1537 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays