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Explain The Police Mission In Democratic Societies

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Explain The Police Mission In Democratic Societies
Workshop 2 Learning Objectives
Brian E. Anthony
Indiana Wesleyan University
Introduction to Criminal Justice
CRJ-181
Wayne Wallace

Workshop 2 Learning Objectives
Chapter 6 Objective 1
Explain the police mission in democratic societies.
The mission of the police is wide in scope. It includes enforcing and supporting the laws for the country they not only serve, but live in. They are tasked with not only preventing crime, but also investigating them and arresting those who violate the law. They serve as peace officers, working not just to maintaining peace in society, but also improving it. They are also expected to be there when needed in emergency situations
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We will encourage and promote community involvement on all levels to achieve these ends”] ("Mission Statement," n.d., p. 1).

Chapter 7 Objective 1
Explain how the Bill of Rights and democratically inspired legal restraints help protect our personal freedoms.
The Bill of Rights and our entire county was founded on the principle of freedom from government control and ensuring personal liberties for all its citizens. Our founding fathers were reminded of the violation of citizen rights by the British government throughout the revolution ("Charters of Freedom," 2013, para. 2). The intent was to limit control and size of the government’s interference and reign on the people, to ensure that the type of tyranny exhibited by the British could not happen in the United States of America.
From 1789 throughout today, the Bill of Rights and our Constitutional liberties are used as the basic construct and guideposts for modern law. It is through the interpretation and application of such documents and case law that set both precedent and establishment of our liberties and personal freedoms.

Chapter 8 Objective 4
Summarize the guidelines for using force and for determining when excessive force has been
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For the most part, in order for a court proceeding to ensue, we need a victim. In some cases the victim may very well be the state or municipality we reside in; however, the victim is usually another person against whom a crime has occurred. The role of the victim is to present the details of the crime to the jury. The victim may be examined, cross examined, and redirected by either the prosecution or defense attorneys. It is the hope of the victim that the jury will deliberate and arrive at a verdict that is sought to bring justice to the accused and closure to the victim.
The jury is a group of selected individuals from within the community who are chosen to interpret facts and evidence and apply the law to cases for which they have been assigned. The jurors have no real training in the law, they are expected to be impartial and only consider what facts the judge instructs them are applicable. They are read the law and charges and it is up to them to determine if the accused is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. Several jury trials have been so popular that they were featured on radio and television. Such was the case for the O.J. Simpson trial where over 2000 reporters covered the trial and the verdict was shown on every major television network including CNN (Jones, 2014, para.

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