Top-Rated Free Essay
Preview

The expansion of suffrage with the passing of the 15th, the 19th, and the 26th Amendments. How the right to vote has expanded over the years in this country.

Good Essays
370 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
The expansion of suffrage with the passing of the 15th, the 19th, and the 26th Amendments. How the right to vote has expanded over the years in this country.
Suffrage has come a long way. At first, only white men who owned property could vote. Today, anyone who is an American citizen at least 18 years of age, a resident of the State in which they want to vote, and registered to vote may take part in an election. It was not easy getting to where we are today. There were many things that contributed to the expansion of suffrage, including the passing of three very important amendments: the 15th, the 19th, and the 26th Amendment.

African Americans were not allowed to vote at all before 1870. That year, the effort to expand voting rights to these individuals began with the 15th Amendment. The 15th Amendment declares that the right to vote cannot be denied to any citizen of the United States because of race, color, or previous condition of servitude. The amendment was intended to ensure that African American men could vote. Yet African Americans still did not have the right to vote until almost 90 years after the amendment was ratified.

Even after the 15th Amendment, women of any race could not vote. This came to an end with the 19th Amendment, which prohibited the denial of the right to vote because of sex. This amendment was ratified in 1920 and by then, more than half of the States allowed women to vote. Wyoming was the first State to give suffrage to women. It did so in 1869.

The latest expansion to suffrage came with the adoption of the 26th Amendment in 1971. It provides that no State can set the minimum age for voting at more than 18 years of age. So, those 18 years of age or older now have the right to vote. Before the added amendment to our Constitution, the accepted voting age among the States was 21. Only four states had a lower voting age before the 26th Amendment.

In conclusion, Americans had to jump through a lot of hurdles to obtain the voting rights we have today. There were a lot of events that happened throughout our history that expanded suffrage through the years. Some of these very important events included the addition of three amendments to our constitution: the 15th, 19th, and 26th Amendments.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Expanding Suffrage Dbq

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In a democracy a country’s people partake in the involvement of the nation’s decision making with the ability to cast their vote for someone who they feel will best represent their beliefs and opinions in government. A person’s suffrage seems like a large privilege- the ability to influence what happens in government. Yet who gets to be granted this right? Everyone, or only a certain group of people who the government feels deserves to be able to vote? In present-day America, every U.S citizen 18 years of age and older, male or female, is allowed to vote, yet this was not always the case. Over the course of a few-hundred years, the United States’ requirements to vote changed several times. At one point, only a white man who owned land could vote. At another time, all man could vote. Eventually, women were granted the right to vote as well. These changes all happened over time and this course of events began with President Andrew Jackson’s period in office. During the Jacksonian Democracy, it was believed that there should be little governing over the people, and whatever governing was to be done should be by the people themselves. Taking this into account, a large debate arose of whether or not suffrage should be expanded.…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Women used many different methods to earn the right to vote in the Women’s Suffrage Movement. One method women used was by having a parade. The parade was good at first there was many people who showed up. But many people didn't like what the women were doing so they made fun of them calling them horrible names.They had bottles thrown at them and were attacked by men. they were beaten and the police did not help. But it paid off because the newspaper wrote about what happened and made it a national issue. Another method was picket lines at the white house. They picked at the white house to get an amendment would be passed. They were called names and were mocked by everyone on the street.They were eventually beaten once again by pedestrians.They…

    • 248 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    AP-Suffrage In England

    • 1429 Words
    • 4 Pages

    "Describe the steps taken between 1832 and 1918 to extend the suffrage in England. What group and movements contributed to the extension of the vote?" Several groups, movements and reform bills passed between 1832 and 1918 extended the suffrage in England. The process took many years and the voting rights were first given to the wealthier and more distinguished men, then later to the less wealthy men, and finally to women. The major reform bills that extended the suffrage in England were the Reform Bill of 1832, 1867, and 1884, and the Qualification of Women Act in 1917. (Mazour, Peoples) The suffrage movement began in 1832 when the Reform Bill of 1832 was passed by parliment. The Prime Minister since 1830, Earl Grey, authored the Bill and it was introduced to the House of Commons in March of 1831 by John Russell. The bill was put down several times between 1831 and 1832. These decisions sent the English people into frenzies and riots broke out in many British towns. Finally the bill was passed in 1832 when it was brought to parliament for the third time. The bill gave men who occupied homes with an annual value of 10 pounds the right to vote, but left out large sections of the lower middle class. Although some people were dissatisfied with the new bill because it only gave one in seven males the right to vote, it was a step in the right direction for the British. (Spartacus Educational Website) After the Reform Bill of 1832 was passed a group of citizens formed the Workingman's Association, supporters of which were called chartists. The chartists believed in universal manhood suffrage and the secret ballot. The proposals were made known in the People's Charter, which was denied by the Parliament. The chartists attempted to achieve their goal of universal manhood suffrage by using moral force, petitions, general strikes, physical force, public meetings and chartist newspapers which spread propaganda. These tactics proved to be useless because the parliament would…

    • 1429 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Elections were changed forever when the youth received the right to vote from the passing of the new amendment to the Constitution. On July 1, 1971 the Twenty-sixth amendment was passed and children at the young age of eighteen were forever given the right to vote in elections. The twenty-sixth amendment affect youth in a positive way because it allowed their voices to be heard.…

    • 1648 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The 19th Amendment gave American Women the right to vote. American Women were able to accomplish this breakthrough with great difficulty, but after pushing the issue towards congress and taking a stand they finally had their victory even if it took them decades to get the amendment approved. In the early 19th century women suffrage groups took a stand and marched, wrote letters, and practiced proper civil defiance to accomplish this great American change.…

    • 410 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the United States, we have the privilege to vote. This privilege was given to us through the constitution and its amendments. Today, every citizen of the United States has the right to vote. When the Declaration of Independence was signed, the right to vote was limited exclusively for white protestant men who owned property. In 1792, New Hampshire was the first state that discarded the property requirement to vote. Maryland became the last state to eliminate a religious restriction on voting. This allowed almost every white man to have the right to vote. In the years of 1869 and 1870, the fifteenth Amendment was passed giving all men the right to vote, no matter their race or color. The years 1919 to 1920 were big years for women. The Nineteenth Amendment was passed by congress, giving all citizens the right to vote no matter their gender. Then in 1971, the Twenty-Sixth Amendment enforced the national voting age of eighteen and older.…

    • 523 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women's Suffrage History

    • 753 Words
    • 4 Pages

    After the Seneca Falls Convention of 1848 requested ladies' suffrage interestingly, America got to be occupied by the coming Civil War. The issue of the vote reemerged amid Reconstruction.…

    • 753 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Throughout United States history, voting requirements have broadened, allowing different kinds of people to vote. In the early 1800s, only white men could vote. However, they did not need property to vote anymore. In addition, the white men no longer needed to take the religious test to vote. By the mid-1800s, most white males had the privilege to vote. After the Civil War in the year 1865, men of all races could vote. The 15th Amendment declared that any male could vote regardless of their race, color or whether they were a slave or not. This amendment did not get approved until voting rights for African Americans were secured by 1960s legislation and court decisions. In the years 1919 and 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified. This amendment granted women the right to vote regardless of race.…

    • 691 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Women had to endure and go through many struggles in order to gain freedoms that were automatically given to free, white men. The journey to gain these rights was difficult and took many years to complete. Women had to prove that were “worthy” enough to vote and have the rights of men. After years of these difficulties, women were finally granted the ninth amendment: the right to vote. The country can never forget how it came to be, however. During much of the 1800s and in the beginning of the 1900s, women had to fight for their right to vote through petitions, protests, and letters.…

    • 669 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    This is where the 15th, 19th, 22nd, and 26th amendments changed those laws. With the 15th amendment I have the right to vote for who I want because I am a citizen. The 19th amendment explains that we are not discriminated by gender because the constitution back then learned that women can be equally competitive with men. The 22nd amendment allows only for a limited of ten years in office as a president. Lastly, the 26th amendment repeals the age limit of voting to 18 years of age.…

    • 455 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Nat Marshall draft notes for English course work 12th Jan Should the age at which people gain the right to vote be lowered to 16? The right to vote is a very important human right. It gives us an opportunity to participate in the way democratic countries are governed.…

    • 747 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Throughout modern history, people have fought and died for the right to vote in multiparty elections. In many nations, people have risen up and deposed military dictators so they could vote and in many nations that struggle still continues today. In our nation, the struggle for the right to vote continued for over a century after the U.S. Constitution granted voting rights to white male landowners. It took over a century before American women were given the right to vote. African-Americans have had the constitutional right to vote for 130 years, but it wasn't until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965 before these rights were enforced by federal authorities. Eighteen-year-olds were granted the right to vote more than…

    • 3787 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Here in America, women had to fight for the right to vote, because they were not included in the Constitution. African Americans and Native Americans were also not included. All American citizens now have the right to vote.…

    • 1023 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Representation of the People Act 1918 allowed most women aged 30 and over to vote for the first time and the Representation of the People Act 1969 lowered the voting age from 21 years to 18 as at present.…

    • 518 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Universal Suffrage

    • 14297 Words
    • 58 Pages

    Citizens become eligible to vote after reaching the voting age, which is typically 18 years as of 2012. Most democracies no longer extend different rights to vote on the basis of sex or race. Resident aliens can vote in some countries and in others exceptions are made for citizens of countries with which they have close links (e.g. some members of the Commonwealth of Nations, and the members of the European…

    • 14297 Words
    • 58 Pages
    Good Essays