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Exemplification Of 'Lydia In The Book The Local News'

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Exemplification Of 'Lydia In The Book The Local News'
Exemplification Essay

When you were a teenager did it ever feel like the world was out to get you? Like at any moment everything you know and care about could be gone? Most teenagers feel this way while going through that crazy time in their lives, where everything seems right but yet so wrong. When all they want to know is who they are. To some teenagers it is too much to handle. Usually there is an underlining reason for a teen to be troubled; home, school, peer pressure, grades, friends, and lastly family can all play a big part. In the book “The Local News”(1) by Miriam Gershow, the main character Lydia and her family go through a horrible tragedy of losing her brother Danny. How do you communicate or get through to someone who has been through something like that?
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Most teenagers like Lydia in “The Local News” need an adult to reach out and just listen. According to Diane Crim, “to listen means to avoid interrupting and it means to pay close attention.” (2) When I read this I thought it made perfect sense. I remember when talking with my parents they always wanted to throw in their two cents while I was opening up. Teenagers will ask you for advice or feedback if they want it. Sadly in Lydia’s case, she didn’t have parents to open up to. It was a tragedy that Danny went missing, but Lydia’s parents forgot about how she felt, and that it affected her, as well. Lydia needed someone to reach out to her, to comfort her, to have a shoulder to cry

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