Examples Of Totalitarianism In George Orwell's Novel 1984

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Cellphones and technology have become a major part of todays’ society. A totalitarian government is centralized and has total control over its people. On the other hand a democratic government makes major decisions through majority vote. In George Orwell’s novel 1984, Winston’s perspective depicts his life living in Oceania under a totalitarian. In this age of cell phones and mobile devices equipped with recording capabilities, when anyone says or does could wind up on the “internet” within minutes, showing similar tactics as Big Brother, but not entirely. Oceania’s totalitarian government is different from contemporary Canada by eliminating independent rights, creating psychological control and allowing no freedom of any sort. The government of Oceania is constantly watching over its Party members, therefore invading total privacy. This shows that …show more content…
Canadians are allowed to do what they want in respect to the law. However, the government of Oceania does not even allow the Party members to choose their own life partners. Party members are not allowed to have sex unless its purpose is solely for reproduction. The idea of the Party is to eliminate human emotion and make everyone live just for the Party. The main idea of the Party is that freedom is slavery, meaning that working for the Party is freedom. In contrast, contemporary Canada has many fundamental freedoms, which showcase that Canada is a free country. These rights include: freedom of speech, freedom of thought and religion. The list continues and shows that Canada is a free country because it is not run by a totalitarian government. In Canada, under the Civil Marriage Act, it allows Canadian citizens to marry who they want. In other words citizens have the freedom to marry anyone, disregarding gender and sexual orientation. Freedom in Oceania is different from freedom in

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