Examining the Civil War

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Examining the Civil War

Examining the Civil War
A war that originated because the nation was divided ultimately marked the beginning of a truly unified United States. The Civil War put to rest the increasing sectionalism that divided the North, the South, and the newly colonized West. At the root were the issues of slavery in the South, and the attempt of the Southern states to withdraw from the Union. Although many lives and untold millions were lost in personal belongings, livestock, and structures, the Civil War set in motion the progression towards a unified Nation. During the 18th and 19th century, slavery was a very significant aspect of the development of the nation. The economic, social, and political development of the nation during this period was directly associated to slavery even though society condemned it as morally wrong. The following will detail the significance of slavery in the economic, social, and political development of the 18th and 19th century America. Additionally details will show the economic, social, and political impacts of the conflict as well as why a democratic nation failed to address the crisis peacefully.
Before the Civil War, many decades before, the rural South’s economic society depended upon its market of the production and export of rice, tobacco, sugar and cotton. Slave labor was the main way to produce these crops. Slavery helped develop and establish the plantation system. “Slaves represented an enormous capital investment, worth more then all the land in the Old South” (Davidson, 2002, p 242). Slavery was the most profitable investment in the production of the staple crops. With an average of $30 to $35 a year, and sometimes even less, a slave-owner ended up taking home 60% of the yearly wealth from the slave’s labor. Not many whites owned slaves; however, those that did held political power, great wealth and authority. Even though there was great wealth to be gained from slavery there were people and regions



References: Clayton, A., Perry, E.I., Reed, L., Winkler, A.M. (2003) America Pathways to the President Modern American History. Copyright 2003 by Pearson Education, Inc. Davidson, J. (Ed). (2002). Nation of nations: A concise narrative of the American Republic (3rd ed., Vol. 1). New York: McGraw-Hill. Retrieved on April 7, 2007 From http://mycampus.phoenix.edu/secure/resource/resource.asp Davis, W.C. (1983). The civil war, Brothers against brothers. The war begins. Chicago, IL: Time-Life Books, Inc. Faust, P.L. (2002). Historical times encyclopedia of the civil war. Retrieved April 14, 2007, from http://www.civilwarhome.com/warcost.htm Hansen, D. (1962). The civil war. New York: Duell, Sloan, and Pearce. The Social Studies Help Center. (2006). Sectionalism. Retrieved on April 13, 2007 from http://www.socialstudieshelp.com/Lesson_29_Notes_SEC_HO.htm

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