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Evolutionary Psychology Controversy

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Evolutionary Psychology Controversy
A new idea is never accepted easily; when an idea first comes into existence many questions are raised before the notion convinces anyone. Along with a new theory comes many new controversies and critiques which go against the bright new idea. An example of a brilliant idea which still has many controversies surrounding it is the notion of evolutionary psychology. As this field progresses into the world, many brilliant scientists from around the world reason why they think it’s false. Both supporters and adversaries not only helped shed light for each other, but also helped shed light in helping me decide whether I wanted to stand behind this new field, or be among the many that decline it.
Evolutionary psychology is the up and coming belief
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For example, many brilliant minds critiqued that the field was not fully complete. Before becoming a successful field, it had many problems it needed to sort out. One brilliant scientist said that psychology had to deal with its dualism of mind vs body before it can even think of becoming a complete science. Not only were there critiques but controversies as well, one common controversy which was present, was the idea whether this theory could even be tested. Many scientists began to question whether evolutionary psychology could be tested and if so, how. Scientists were worried that psychological hypothesis could not be empirically tested or falsified. The evolutionary psychologists responded to this controversy quickly by making aware that the testing of evolutionary psychology is just as similar as the testing of any other science. Just like the other sciences, researchers formulate a hypothesis, in this case, something about an evolved psychological mechanism, and then put them to the test. One other major controversy which surrounds evolutionary psychology questions whether human behavior is the result of learning or evolution. Many scientists felt that the habits and instincts of a human were learned as the human grew older, they were not preprogrammed in his mind. Evolutionary psychologists responded to this idea by claiming that scientists were looking at the idea all wrong. The scientists were too busy trying to predict if it was a matter of nature or nurture that they could not see how the two exist at the same time. A great example of both interacting is seen in calluses which are formed with repeated friction to the

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    References: Buss, D. M. (n.d.). Evolutionary Theory and Psychology. American Psychological Association (APA). Retrieved May 19, 2013, from http://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2009/05/sci-brief.aspx…

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