Ethics JointForces Paper DRAFT 1

Topics: Medical ethics, Military of the United States Pages: 24 (6210 words) Published: February 23, 2015
MILITARY ETHICS



Team Writing Notes: 
Journal of Military Ethics Writing Guidelines (This journal uses a pseudo­APA style for citations  that will need to be entered manually; see the following link for details and citation guidance):  http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=smil20&page=instructions#. VNDbV2jVofx 

 
TEAM COLOR CODE 
PETER 
FOUAD 
MO 

 
ABSTRACT 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
KEY WORDS 
Ethical Leadership; Joint Force; Military Ethics training and development; Multinational;  Profession of Arms 
 

MILITARY ETHICS



 
 
  
MILITARY ETHICS: THE JOINT FORCE’S MOST ESSENTIAL UNIFORM  
 

FOR SUBMISSION TO 
JOURNAL OF MILITARY ETHICS 
 
 
 

Major Peter J. Reiley, USAF 
Major Morina Foster, USMC 
Lieutenant Colonel Fouad El Hayek, LAF 
 
 
 
Joint Forces Staff College 
Joint and Combined Warfighting School  
Class #15­01 
Submission Date 
 
 
Faculty Advisor: Teresa Dicks 
Seminar #7 
 
 

A submission to the Faculty of the Joint and Combined Warfighting School in partial satisfaction  of the requirements for Joint Professional Military Education Phase II. The contents of this  submission reflect our writing team’s original views and are not necessarily endorsed by the  Joint Forces Staff College or the Department of Defense. 

MILITARY ETHICS



MILITARY ETHICS: THE JOINT FORCE’S MOST ESSENTIAL UNIFORM INTRODUCTION
A shared standard of just and honorable military ethics unites the U.S. Armed Forces,  keeps the faith of the American people, and strengthens critical bonds with allies and partner  nations around the world.  Military ethics is the Joint Force’s most essential uniform, but it has  been stained by cases of ethical misconduct throughout the ranks.  While many military members  have dedicated their lives to the honorable service of their nation, these destructive incidents  have undermined the trust that the American people placed in the U.S. Military and damaged its  integrity in the eyes of the world.  Prominent ethical transgressions in the force’s highest  positions have even compromised internal trust, which is a unifying element of the military  profession and essential to the chain of command.  The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff,  General Martin E. Dempsey, has called for a renewed commitment to the Profession of Arms  that emphasizes trust and leadership, and is defined by ethics, standards of excellence, code of  conduct, and professional values that sustain the Joint Force’s commitment to the rule of law  (Dempsey 2012a; 2014).  Prior to stepping down as Secretary of Defense, Secretary Chuck  Hagel added to this traditional, top­down approach to cultivating military ethics by appointing a  senior general officer to serve as an Ethics Czar for the forces and stem the tide of these growing  ethical issues (Garamone 2014a; 2014b).  It is important to recognize, however, that ethical  transgressions are merely visible symptoms; the Joint Force must equip itself to better  understand and defend against their root causes.  This effort should combine top­down methods  that leverage the talents of top senior officers with a more bottom­up approach that taps into the  vital support and perspectives of military members at lower levels. 

MILITARY ETHICS



As the U.S. Armed Forces strive to address underlying ethical concerns, this effort must  also be framed in an increasingly expansive, multinational environment that is shared by  international allies and partner nation forces.  General Dempsey’s (2012b: 6) Capstone Concept  for the future of Joint Operations emphasized that ‘globally integrated operations place a  premium on partnering’.  While military operations exist within a broader constellation of  national powers, which also rely on other governmental and nongovernmental organizations,  indigenous cultures, and regional stakeholders, a critical element of globally integrated ...


References: Bandura, A. (1986) ​
Social Foundations of Thought and Action.​
 
Bandura, A. (2002) Selective Moral Disengagement in the Exercise of Moral Agency. ​
Brown, M. E., & Treviño, L. K. (2006) Ethical Leadership: A Review and Future 
Directions. ​
Brown, M. E., Treviño, L. K., & Harrison, D. A. (2005) Ethical Leadership: A Social Learning 
Perspective for Construct Development and Testing. ​
Cook, M. L. & Syse, H. (2010) What Should We Mean by ‘Military Ethics?’ ​
Journal of 
Cullen, J. B., Parboteeah, K. P., & Hoegl, M. (2004) Cross­National Differences in Managers’ 
Willingness to Justify Ethically Suspect Behaviors: A Test of Institutional Anomie 
Dempsey, M. E. (2012a) ​
America’s Military: A Profession of Arms.​
Dempsey, M. E. (2012b) ​
Capstone Concept for Joint Operations: Joint Force 2020​
 
Dempsey, M. E. (2014) ​
 
Donaldson, T., & Dunfee, T. (1999) ​
Garamone, J. (2014a) ​
Hagel Will Appoint Senior Officer to Guide Ethics Effort.​
 
Garamone, J. (2014b) ​
Grassey, T. B. (2005) Why Ethics is So Hard in ​
Ethics and the Military Profession: The Moral  
Husted, B. W. (1999). Wealth, Culture and Corruption. ​
Journal of International Business 
 
Hofstede, G. (2001) ​
Lucas, G. R. & Rubel, W. R. (Eds) (2005) ​
Ethics and the Military Profession: The Moral 
 
Mastroianni, G. R. (2011) The Person–Situation Debate: Implications for Military Leadership 
Mayer, D. M., Aquino, K., Greenbaum, R. L., & Kuenzi, M. (2012) Who Displays Ethical 
Leadership, and Why Does It Matter? An Examination of Antecedents and Consequences 
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • ethics paper
  • Paper 1 draft sociology
  • Code Of Ethics Paper 1
  • ACA Code of Ethics Paper
  • Ethics Final Paper
  • Code of Ethics Paper
  • organizational ethics paper
  • Code Of Ethics Paper revised

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free