ETHICAL ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Topics: Ethics, Human rights, Business ethics Pages: 11 (3103 words) Published: October 12, 2013
ETHICS

ETHICAL ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Many of the ethical issues and dilemmas in international business are rooted in the fact that political systems, law, economic development, and culture vary significantly from Nation to nation. Consequently, what is considered normal practice in one nation may be considered unethical in others. Because they work for an institution that transcends National borders and cultures, managers in a multinational firm need to be particularly sensitive to these differences and able to choose the ethical action in those circumstances where variation across societies creates the potential for ethical problems. In the international business setting, the most common ethical issues involve employment practices, Human rights, environmental regulations, corruption, and the moral obligation of multinational Corporations.

EMPLOYMENT PRACTICES
As we saw in the opening case, ethical issues may be associated with employment practices in other nations. When work conditions in a host nation are clearly inferior to those in a multinational’s home nation, what standards should be applied? Those of the home nation, those of the host nation, or something in between? While few would suggest that pay and work conditions should be the same across nations, how much divergence is acceptable? For example, while 12-hour workdays, extremely low pay, and a failure to protect workers against toxic chemicals may be common in some developing nations, does this mean that it is OK for a multinational to tolerate such working conditions in its subsidiaries there, or to condone it by using local subcontractors?

HUMAN RIGHTS
Beyond employment issues, questions of human rights can arise in international business. Basic human rights still are not respected in many nations. Rights that we take for granted in developed nations, such as freedom of association, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of movement, freedom from political repression, and so on, are by no means universally accepted. One of the most obvious examples was South Africa during the days of white rule and apartheid, which did not end until 1994. Among other things, the apartheid system denied basic political rights to the majority nonwhite population of South Africa, mandated segregation between whites and nonwhites, reserved certain occupations exclusively for whites, and prohibited blacks from being placed in positions where they would manage whites. Despite the odious nature of this system, Western businesses operated in South Africa. By the 1980s, however, many questioned the ethics of doing so. They argued that inward investment by foreign multinationals, by boosting the South African economy, supported the repressive apartheid regime.

MORAL OBLIGATIONS

Multinational corporations have power that comes from their control over resources and their ability to move production from country to country. Although that power is constrained not only by laws and regulations, but also by the discipline of the market and the competitive process, it is nevertheless substantial. Some moral philosophers argue that with power comes the social responsibility for multinationals to give something back to the societies that enable them to prosper and grow. The concept of social responsibility refers to the idea that businesspeople should consider the social consequences of economic actions when making business decisions, and that there should be a presumption in favor of decisions that have both good economic and social consequences. In its purest form, social responsibility can be supported for its own sake simply because it is the right way for a business to behave. Advocates of this approach argue that businesses, particularly large successful businesses, need to recognize their noblesse oblige and give something back to the societies that have made their success possible. Noblesse oblige is a French term that refers to honorable and...

References: Years (Doubleday, 1997).
3). H. Hamilton, “Shell’s New World Wide View,”
Washington Post, August 2, 1998, p
(New Haven, CT: Yale University Press,
2002).
Press, 1993).
1997), pp. 1320–46.
Corning (1996).html.
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • International Legal and Ethical Issues in Business Essay
  • International Leagal and Ethical Issues in Business Essay
  • International business Research Paper
  • international business Essay
  • Essay about International Business Ethical Practices
  • The Three Legal & Ethical Issues in Business in Bangladesh Essay
  • Current Ethical Issues in Business Essay
  • International Legal and Ethical Issues in Business Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free