ETH 125 Historical Report On Race

Topics: United States, Race, Law Pages: 5 (454 words) Published: April 22, 2015
Throughout most of U.S. history, in most locations, the majority race has been White/Caucasian according to the (US Census) 72% of the population were White, the ancestry is primarily of European decent including Germany, Ireland, England, Italy, Scandinavia, and Poland, with some in the Middle East and North Africa. The highest population of the White race is in the Midwestern states. I believe that the longer your ancestors live in America the degree of mixed heritage, will become increased, because of interracial marriages, and births. Some of the larger races in US history are Native Americans, until the White settlers moved into the area in the 15th Century. Hispanic/Latino is of no particular race their ancestry is of Latin America, this race in the US was around the 15th Century, Asian and Pacific Islanders are of Far East, Southeast Asia, and Pacific Islands. Several laws were in place that specifically singled out certain Ethnic groups, some examples, (Jim Crow laws) primarily targeted Blacks. (The Civil Rights amendment) put an end to the 100-year law. (The Page Act of 1875) targeted the Asian race. The Civil Rights act also helped in abolishing this law. Japanese American Internment was targeting Asians; specifically Japanese this law stated the US military could exclude all Japanese from the Pacific coast resulting in thousands of Asian people, in concentration camps. Civil liberties act abolished this law. (The Mexican Repatriation law) was specifically against Hispanic/Latino people, this law forced two million people of Mexican descent to leave the United States. (The Apology Act for the 1930s Mexican Repatriation Program) abolished this law. In February 2005, California State Senator Joseph Dunn (D-Garden Grove) introduced Senate Bill 670 to apologize for the "unconstitutional removal and coerced migration" of Californians during the Great Depression. Before "The Apology Act for the 1930s Mexican Repatriation Program” passed on February 22, Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis had twice vetoed it.

Summary: My belief is that the updated laws were, created to abolish the unfair laws; I feel they did work to some extent, although we still have a long way to go with racism in the United States, and I see a definite improvement as compared to the 18th century. The law that I feel was the most beneficial to all is the Civil Rights law, this has changed the way people of all race, gender, religion, or ethnic origin the legal rights they deserve.

Bibliography

WelcometoOurDocuments.gov. (n.d.).Retrieved from
http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=97
Frame, C. S. (2009). Mexican Repatriation: A Generation between Two Borders. Retrieved from California University San Marcos website: http://public.csusm.edu/frame004/index.html Civil Liberties Act of 1988 enacted by the United States Congress August 10, 1988

Bibliography: WelcometoOurDocuments.gov. (n.d.).Retrieved from
http://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=97
Frame, C. S. (2009). Mexican Repatriation: A Generation between Two Borders. Retrieved from California University San Marcos website: http://public.csusm.edu/frame004/index.html Civil Liberties Act of 1988 enacted by the United States Congress August 10, 1988
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