Preview

Essay On Witch Trials In Salem

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
590 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Essay On Witch Trials In Salem
Witch trials in Salem in late the 1600s create hysterical climate and lead to death by hanging of 19 innocents. Recent investigation into the historical events reveal the true reasons behind the deaths of the accused of witchcraft and of “compacting with the Devil” after several old artifacts were found. Religious extremism, false accusations, vengeance and desire to protect reputations were revealed as the true causes of the massacre.
A few centuries ago, between the 1300s and 1600s many practicing religious people at the time reckoned that the Devil could give typically women, known as witches, a power to hurt others in return for their loyalty. In 1692, in Salem, Massachusetts, New England, USA, this belief was taken to the extreme and led
…show more content…
Some say that the symptoms, delusions, and hallucinations were caused by a poisonous mushroom. However, recent findings expose something unknown. The apparent journal of the Reverend John Hale, the so called “spiritual doctor”, was found in the ruins of an old farm near Salem. The journal reveals a completely different view of the events and many previously unknown happenings. He says that the accusations started out of revenge towards some members of the community and quickly escalated into an unmeasured pointing of fingers. Ultimately, the 19 people died as a result of a series of bad decisions and respective consequences. In the end, Abigail Williams, Betty’s cousin, was guilty. According to Hale’s journal, her actions, motivated by jealousy, led to the allegations and sentencing of the convicted. Furthermore, the villagers acted on long-held grudges when accusing each other, making the fear of guilt by association become pernicious. Also, the procedures in court were seemingly not followed, for example, complete trust was given to the “victims”. Consequently, everyone accused was seen as unreliable and dishonest. It is said that Abigail Williams ran away when people started to suspect her and ended up being a prostitute in Boston, most likely dying a few years later in the same

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Salem Village in 1869 was a small town filled with witchcraft, possession and ultimate fear. For ten months trials prosecuting innocent civilians, 19 resulting fatal, took place. Betty and Abigail Williams, two young girls, were the first in this domino effect that took place; claiming that they had been “ bitten and pinched by invisible agents; their arms, neck and backs turned this way and that way, and back again”. Betty soon began complaining of “prickling sensations and feelings of being choked”. These peculiar symptoms that couldn’t seem to be solved by any sort of medical reasoning are what set off the paranoid phenomenon that took place in Salem. More and more trials began taking place, accusing more innocent people of witchcraft. During these trials the magistrates would use “spectral evidence”, which was a victims account of what they had seen during one of their “torments”. Only the victims of witchcraft could see “the shape of the tormentor”; hardly proof at all if you ask me. This evidence was considered to be “the most damning and dangerous kind of proof”. This kind of “invisible proof” and witchcraft was most commonly known as a matter of maleficium. The possessed were thought to have made a deal with the devil himself in exchange for some sort of magical powers. This widespread fear of the unknown and supernatural is what condemned so many innocent lives. However, several philosophers saw these terrifying violent fits as simply a physiological disturbance. Pediatrician Ernest Caulfield found that “the accused were sick children in the worst sort of metal distress-living in fear for their very lives and the welfare of their immortal souls”. People feared that if they did not plead guilty to being a witch then they would be sentenced to death. This severe mental stress and trauma could have very well led to such outrageous behavior as seen in the trials. Sarah Churchill was victim to these extreme pressures as well. She eventually “succumbed to her…

    • 560 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Imagine hearing your own child screaming in pain because of witches. Then, imagine being awoken by people pounding at your front door. Imagine sitting there in a court room being accused for being a witch. Sadly this is what happened in the Salem Witch Trials, which occurred in Salem, Massachusetts. The Salem Witch Trials were a dark time in American history, because innocent people were hanged.…

    • 535 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    AP Euro Witchcraft

    • 402 Words
    • 2 Pages

    From about 1480-1700, many individuals in Europe were accused of being witches, put on trial, prosecuted and later executed for witchcraft. This witch craze was concentrated in southwestern Germany, Switzerland, England, Scotland, Poland, and parts of France, and resulted in 100,000 witches put on trial. The three main reasons for the persecution of these “witches” were economic greed, religious beliefs and social prejudices.…

    • 402 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    A time of death, fear, witches, scapegoating, and bizarre miscommunications between a community all in one area Salem, Massachusetts. Accusations broke out between the populace and people in 1692. The Salem Witch Hysteria (meaning a chaotic level of fear) of 1692 began with two girls, Betty Parris, daughter of Samuel Parris, and Abigail Williams. The young cousins first accused Tituba, a West Indian brought to assist them in their fortunes. Not too long afterwards, the young girls began acting strange and absurd. They crawled under chairs, kept to themselves but, under pressure, finally confessed to be under the influence of someone else's witchcraft. They claimed Tituba and two other white women to be the cause of their pain and interesting…

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    People believed witches were associated with the devil and evil, this is why people feared them during the Salem Witch trials. These beliefs originated from the European Witch-Hunts of the 14th to the 18th century, this caused the executions of tens of thousands of people. Over time, the idea of white magic transformed into dark magic and became associated with demons and evil spirits. From 1560 to 1670, witchcraft persecutions became common as superstitions became associated with the devil. The witch’s magic slowly changed and became known as evil, and as the perspective on magic changed so did the perspective on witches. A definition of a witch now is, “A witch, a person, now especially a woman who is supposed to have evil or wicked magical powers.” (Linder, Famous…

    • 818 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The people of Salem were being killed in a whole different manner. Why was this happening, and what was the cause?In Salem, 1692, people were being accused for being witches and for practicing witchcraft. In Salem, at this time people were being hanged for something that didn’t exist. Back then, they didn’t know about fairy tales so when ever they did something wrong they would blame the devil that had entered their body. the Salem witch trial hysteria of 1692 were caused by jealousy,paranormia, and, the teenagers.…

    • 436 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Essay On Salem Witch Dbq

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages

    What if the Salem Witch Trial Hysteria of 1692 was caused by a simple lie? What would you be thinking? There's no way? That's impossible? There have been many ideas of what caused the Salem Witch Trials researched by historians, but most of them are not true, most of them can't be backed. But first we must review some key vocabulary; Hysteria. Hysteria is an outbreak of emotion or fear. The three most logical causes of the Salem Witchcraft Hysteria of 1692 are biased amongst the community, attention for the poor, and acting by the accusing girls/women.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Breaking the law was no joke back in colonial times. Punishment were extremely harsh. The convict will be punished by physical pain or sometimes death. Do to the poor judgment from the court's most of the accused were innocent. Even the defendants of the accused were punished, if the accused were proven guilty. One of the crimes that were taken really seriously was Witchcraft, which was punished by death. A lot of innocent women died during those year in Salem. The punishments for crime in colonial times were not fair.…

    • 520 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Salem Possessed Analysis

    • 774 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Salem Possessed redefined the standard for the possibilities social history offers to understand the events and people of early America. Through a painstaking look at local records such as legal records, the Salem Village record book, the minister's book, and tax records Boyer and Nissenbaum discovered a long-standing pattern of contentious behavior of which the witchcraft accusations in 1692 was just one episode. Their analysis provides an invaluable insight into the social history of New England generally, and the factions of Salem Village that led to the tragic events of 1692, in particular.…

    • 774 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Witches are known to be very dangerous, evil, and made deals with the devil. They were even killed, tortured and jailed, but nowadays we treat them completely differently. We invite them into our house, give them candy, and strike conversations with them, that is at least on halloween. In the late 1600s many older men and women were being caught as being “witches” in Salem, Massachusetts.These witch trials were being caused by young girls who were pretending just to get ergotism, attention, and eventually after one lie they got out control really quickly.…

    • 635 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Although witchcraft is commonly associated with the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, there were also other trials throughout the century across colonial New England. It is important to look at some of these other trials also in order to see their cultural and historical impacts. The impacts are often overlooked because all of the attention tends to be put towards the Salem trials. One trial in particular, the 1669 trial of Katherine Harrison, is interesting to look at because of its particular circumstances. Although the essays by two respected historians, Jane Kamensky and Carol Karlsen, never address the trial specifically both seem to offer explanations for Katherine Harrison’s particular witchcraft circumstances.…

    • 1260 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Salem Witch Trial Theories

    • 2287 Words
    • 10 Pages

    The Salem Witch Trials were a series of infamous events that demand an explanation for their occurrence. The trials that took place in 1692 caused neighbors in the community of Salem Village in the colony of Massachusetts to turn on one another out of paranoia, accusing one another of witchcraft. According to Carol Karlsen, a longtime author of the subject, nineteen people were hanged and about 200 others were imprisoned (40). A few theories have been offered in order to explain the root of this mass hysteria. The theories in question need to be examined to see which holds the most credibility.…

    • 2287 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Better Essays

    Salem Witch Trial Essay

    • 1693 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Salem Witch Trials of colonial Massachusetts is an infamous event known throughout the entirety of the world. This is a result of the unnecessary executions of a collection of people. The bloodshed of the number of citizens is referred to as unnecessary for the reason that the trials were supposedly surrounded by paranormal activity. Proof that the accused legitimately participated in demonic activities such as witchcraft was incapable of being found. Although it may be factual that it could not be proven if paranormal activity took place, the government still seized the lives of a variety of innocent individuals. The Salem witch trials are considered heinous for the reason that 20 innocent people were penalized for offenses they did not…

    • 1693 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Meet Ann Putnam Jr. at 12 years old who played a very important part in the witch trials of 1692 as one of three afflicted kids.Anna was the daughter of the Salem witch trials leader. She was born on October 18,1679 in Salem Massachusetts,she was one of three children, Thomas and Ann were her siblings and she was the eldest. In March,1692 she proclaimed to be affiliated. At this time, Ann's Mother Ann was still mourning the death of her daughter and she claimed that later she had been attacked by witches. Another person living in the Putnam house was a lady named Mercy Lewis. Mercy was an orphan as a child, but was remotely related to the Putnam family.…

    • 1274 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The number of different interpretations of the Salem Witch Trials illustrates that historiography is ever changing. The historians, Hale, Starkey, Upham, Boyer and Nissenbaum, Caporal, Norton and Mattosian have all been fascinated by the trials in one way or another because they have all attempted to prove or disprove certain elements about the trials. By analysing their augments about the causes of the Salem Witch Crisis, it is evident that this historical event can be examined from a range of different perspectives and interpreted in a range of different ways. This, in itself, reflects the changing nature of historiography.…

    • 2619 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays