Essay On State Trial Court

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The state Trial Courts are responsible for the arraignment of the defendants at the beginning of a case, selecting a jury among potential jurors, hearing the case from the accused side and the defendants side to effectively evaluate the evidence as according to the legal guidelines. After the hearing and evaluating the presented evidence, the state Trial Court is responsible for determining the facts of the case. When facts are determined the State Court is responsible for pronouncing the judgment, basing it on the facts and the legal guidelines. After making the ruling, the state court is responsible for imposing a sentence to the person found guilty.
The purpose of the state Trial Court is to listen and hear any criminal or civil case that is not in any other jurisdiction of another court. It is of limited jurisdiction as it can only handle some cases based on the amount in controversy, subject matter, administrative matters or statutory grant. The state also aims at finding the facts and determination of the case is made, in this case, though the decision can be appealed to a higher court for review. State Trial Court is the first court to handle a case, and the decision they make affects the people involved in the case alone.
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The state trial courts are where cases start, and they require witnesses and evidence presented in the case. However, the state Supreme Courts and state Court of Appeal need no evidence or witnesses to determine a case. The state trial court has one judge in the courtroom while the state Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court has a group of judges to determine a cause (Tarr, 2013). There is a jury in state trial courts while there is no jury in both the state court of appeal and state Supreme

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