Essay On Separation Of Powers

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The Separation of Powers is very important; it creates unique roles for each branch of government. There are three different branches, there’s the legislative branch, the judicial branch, and the executive branch. In the legislative branch, the laws are created, budgets are passed, and wars are declared. The judicial branch determines which laws apply to specific cases, reviews constitutionally of laws, and determines interpretations of laws. The executive branch enforces, or vetoes the laws that the legislative branch creates, declares state of emergency, and appoints federal judges, cabinet advisers, and others at the approval of the Senate. The purpose of the Separation of Powers is to ensure that no one party or belief can have more control over the government than another.
At one point it was expected, that the Congress would pass laws, the President would execute them, and the Supreme Court would interpret them in individual cases. This was the framework for the Separation of Powers; established by the Constitution, and stuck to it for the greater part of our history. The Founding Fathers were well-acquainted with a long-held tenet of government: the accumulation of power by a single person or body of government is the greatest threat to liberty. In fact, a celebrated feature of the
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Both the delegation of rulemaking authority and the retention of an oversight role of the legislature raise important constitutional questions, specifically the possibility of violating the separation of powers and non-delegation doctrines found in both the United States and South Carolina

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