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Essay On New England Colonies

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Essay On New England Colonies
Developments of New England colonies are rapid in the early 1600s. Colonies developments are influenced by the Puritans, who immigrate to America after protesting against the Church of England fearing religious persecution. The Puritans idea of representative democracy, strict values of frugality, and society based solely around the church shaped the development of the New England colonies from 1630 through the 1660s.
The Puritans idea of a representative democracy greatly influenced the development of the New England colonies. In England, Puritans wanted to reform the Church of England by getting rid of any ceremonies or practices that were not found in the scripture. However, King Charles would not allow this action. This action leads to the Puritans traveling to America eager to develop a colony that would be a model society for the rest of the world (Doc1). It was this idea of creating a model colony that had the Puritans church taking on a major role in shaping the government. The Puritans believed the government should get its power from the people. You had to be a male church member to be able to vote and participate in town meetings. This type of democracy gave a sense of unity throughout the colony. The narrative “We will do nothing to offend
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Church for Puritans functioned as the religious and social center. The layout of the town formed individually owned farms and family houses all center around the church (Doc 2). Love of religion lead Puritans to educate their children and enhanced their education system leading the way for New England colonies to claim ownership for having the best education system. The end result of this idea was the creation of Harvard College. As well, many Puritans thought of themselves as being anointed by God. William Bradford (Doc4) highlights Pequot Wars a fight between Puritans and Native America and gives praise to God for the

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