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Essay On Myasthenia Gravis

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Essay On Myasthenia Gravis
Myasthenia gravis literally translates to “grave muscle weakness;” since 1672, when the disease was first recorded, to the early twentieth-century, the majority of patients diagnosed with it ended up passing away. Medical practitioners back then did not know myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease that attacks the neuromuscular junction, causing weakness and abnormal fatigue of the muscles. Nor, did they have sophisticated treatment options, such as drugs and surgery, to care for their patients. However, due to the advances in medicine, an increased understanding about the origin and pathophysiology of the illness has caused a drastic decrease in the mortality rate. As a result, with today’s medical knowledge, the likeliness of death for …show more content…
Despite this, there are a plethora of different treatment options, such as drugs, surgery, and therapy, to send the disease into remission or mitigate severe symptoms. In the case of medication, there are two classifications of drugs. The first are called anticholinesterases, which temporary relieves the symptoms of myasthenia gravis by preventing the breakdown of acetylcholine; the second are called immunosuppressants, which stop the body from damaging the neuromuscular junction but will compromise the immune system. As far as surgery, doctors recommend thymectomy, the removal of the thymus, for patients under the age of sixty. The removal of an abnormal thymus reduces symptoms and may remit the disease by “re-balancing the immune system.” Lastly, there are two main therapy options. Immune globulin therapy is used to treat rapidly worsening symptoms using donated blood to temporarily modify the immune system; this is expensive and has short-term benefits. The other is plasmapheresis, an expensive therapy with ephemeral relief where the patient’s blood is exchanged for antibody-free blood with albumin. Another opportunity some patients tend to choose is complementary medicine. Spiritual escapes such as meditation, conversation, and exercise help ease side effects and relax the patient (Conquer Myasthenia Gravis 2016) . A holistic style of treatment may help the individual fight against the

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