Preview

Essay On Japanese Feudalism

Powerful Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1174 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Essay On Japanese Feudalism
FEUDALISM IN JAPAN
A BRIEF HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION
The feudalism period in Japan, much like the feudal period in Europe after the Fall of Rome, was ruled by one singular person, followed by a complicated hierarchy of people who had either a lot or next to no power. This report will examine the certain roles of different people that were spread out according to the hierarchy, and how it affected the country/regions socially and economically. The Feudal System in Japan existed from the 9th century until the 12th century, and was not as different, however it wasn’t the same as the Feudal System we saw in Europe after the Fall of Rome
THE FEUDAL JAPAN HIERARCHY
The feudal hierarchies we see from ancient times are a lot like the modern day caste system formed in India a while back, however they do
…show more content…
The next and final ranking in the Royal class were the Royal Priests, of whom had a very high amount of power and control among the rankings and classes, as well as full religious power and control over Feudal Japan.
The next class in the Japanese Feudal System was the Noble Class. This class was comprised of the Shoguns, Daimyo and Samurais.
The highest ranking in the Noble class was Shogun. The shoguns ruled the military parts of Feudal Japan in shadow of the king. The country’s security was under their control and to maintain it was their responsibility.
The next ranking in the Noble class were the Daimyos. They were given the term “warlords” and worked under the word of the Shogun, of whom worked under the word of the Emperor.
The final and lowest ranking of the Noble Class were the Samurais. The samurais were one of the most vital parts of the Japanese Feudal system, as they were the warriors (per say) of the system and were led by the Daimyo. The samurai fought for and only for the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    In the period between 1450 and 1750, Japan underwent many changes in its political and social structure. After a period of chaos, a powerful family rose up and took control of the nation, establishing a new Shogunate and bringing a period of peace and stability to Japan.…

    • 548 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The country was eventually reunited within the late 1500s, and a rigid social class structure was established throughout the Edo amount that placed the samurai at the highest, followed by the farmers, artisans and merchants severally. throughout now, the samurai were forced to measure in castle cities, were the sole ones allowed to possess and carry swords and were paid in rice by their daimyo or social structure lords. uncontrolled samurai were referred to as ronin and caused minor troubles throughout the 1600s.…

    • 418 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Even before the Kamakura period the Japanese warrior had begun his ascent to a higher social status. During the Heian period collateral branches of the imperial line, the Minamoto and Taira clans, represented two of the greatest warrior associations. Wars and battles that broke out during the eleventh century in the Kanto area presented the local warriors and the powerful clans with the chance to continue to build up their power (Schirokauer 181). During Kamakura period the provincial warrior class had managed to consolidate political power at the expense of the nobility. Under the Minamoto clan leader, Yorimoto, the Taira clan was defeated in the Gempei War, a bakufu or "tent government" was established – which demonstrated the military origins of his power - and the emperor named him shogun. The shogun had delegated power under the control of the emperor – which by this time was merely theoretical – and would represent an institution in Japanese politics that would last until the nineteenth century (Schirokauer 289). The shogun maintained his power through the loyalty of vassals - warriors who vowed service to a lord in exchange for military protection and land rights. This loyalty would become the characteristic ideal of the samurai warrior.…

    • 1658 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Analyze major changes and continuities in the political and economic structure of Japan from 1600…

    • 640 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Japanese Feudalism

    • 610 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Both Western Europe and Japan used the feudal system from the 800s to the 1700s. The two regions show economic similarities, but differ greatly with respect to politics and society.…

    • 610 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The feudal system is a structure of ordering society that began in 800 CE where Charlemagne, king of the Franks, gave land to the Church and wealthy nobles in return for their loyalty in running the empire. These ideas had been around for centuries but this was the first time the system had been clearly recorded in history. It took hundreds more years before it spread to the rest of Europe.…

    • 542 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    During the Tokugawa period of Japan a singular map consisted of numerous feudal towns and villages each ruled by individual daimyo lords. The list of individual domains was enormous, so too was the list of cultures, traditions, and material goods specific to the domains and feudal families that lived within the domain’s borders. The right to govern each domain was given to a daimyo lord by the Tokugawa Shogunate; in return, each ruling vassal was required to complete a “form of feudal service.” Known as alternate attendance the Shogun imposed this requirement as a means of political and economic control which restricted individual daimyo rule and reinforced the overall power of the Shogunate. While alternate attendance was a mechanism of political control that promoted peace throughout Japan, Constantine Nomikos Vaporis illustrated the unintentional effects of the hegemon’s policy in Tour of Duty. Vaporis argued that alternate attendance, while considered a “disciplinary institution” by other Japanese scholars, was nevertheless “instrumental in producing a population with a high level of shared culture and experience.”…

    • 900 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Bushido Code History

    • 1287 Words
    • 6 Pages

    This period saw the rise of the samurai, samurai started to become more numerous and influential. According to Colcutt (2000), “The Kamakura regime was overthrown in 1333, replaced briefly by a restored imperial government headed by Emperor Go-Daigo, who was, in his turn, removed by the Ashikaga warrior leaders who had brought him to power” (Colcutt, 2008). It was during the Ashikaga shogunate the samurai became organized into vassal hierarchies and swore loyalty to a daimyo (feudal lords). The samurai also began to develop their own value system the Bushido code, at the time it was comprised of three virtues honor, loyalty, and courage however more virtues will be added later on. Around the fifteenth century the Ashikaga shogunate was not able to maintain control and fell into civil war until the sixteenth century, this period in Japan was known as the warring states, Sengoku Jidai (Colcutt, 2008). According to Khan Academy, “In September of 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu won a decisive victory over rival daimyo factions, including supporters of Hideyoshi’s heir, Hideyori” (“An introduction to the Samurai,” n.d.). The Ashikaga fell and the Tokugawa rose to power and move the capital to Edo (Tokyo), Japan had peace for roughly 260 years. Peace was established through social control of the entire population (“An introduction to the Samurai,” n.d.). Since this was such a…

    • 1287 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Samurai Code

    • 629 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The samurai were highly skilled Japanese warriors from the middle ages. During this time, warring clans controlled most of the country. Therefore, Lords would hire Samurai to defend and fight for land. As a result, the samurai population skyrocketed. In fact, They were so important to society that they became their own social class. The meaning of the word samurai is very fitting. The word samurai comes from a Japanese word Saburau, meaning “to serve.” Although the samurai were called this, according to PBS’ article on the History of the Samurai,”(The word) was first used in A.D 702 to describe mid-to-low ranking administrators.” Their title was mostly metaphorical, referring to their devotion to their leader.…

    • 629 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    travel

    • 2603 Words
    • 11 Pages

    lords, as well as those of the greater and lesser stewards of shogunal cities and provinces,…

    • 2603 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Samurai were a little higher up than Knights in the feudal social order. In the social order in feudal Japan if you were a Samurai you were a warrior who owed loyalty and military service to Dalmyos for land or regular payment. All of the Samurai plus their family made up about ten percent of Japans population. Now, Knights on the other hand were warriors who owed loyalty and military service to a lord for land. There were about twelve thousand Knights in England and Normany France in the twelfth century. (Documents A, B)…

    • 455 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Feudalism, beginning in Western Europe and later appearing in Japan, is the system of government in which nobles have certain owed loyalties to the king, in return for grants of land which are run by the serfs. Three specific areas that share similarities and differences between these two are: why and when their feudalism began, agriculture and art during the time, and the ranking and status of the different Feudal statuses, particularly the military.…

    • 362 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In the sixteenth century, Tokugawa Japan had a feudal system of domains that brought their political system together and set them apart from other countries. This system was based upon a supreme ruler, the Shogun, who was over several Daimyo. The Daimyo served as lords of land holders who reported to the Shogun. This system was a catalyst in the rapid progress and development of this country. The country’s natural landscape and their religious/political standing made them a calm and stable people. Peace and order as well as the centralized feudal system were strong elements in this culture’s success.…

    • 540 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Musui's Story

    • 1623 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Japanese society was divided into four classes: samurai, peasants, artisans, and merchants. The samurai was a class of warriors, emerged from Japan during the constant civil ware period. As quoted from the learning channel (1994): 
The samurai 's life was like the cherry blossom 's, beautiful and brief. For him, as for the flower, death followed naturally, gloriously. 
Ancient Warriors - The Samurai 
They were to remain loyal to their commanders who were themselves loyal to the Shogun. Failing their master in any way was unacceptable, and to regain commitment and secure an afterlife after such incident usually meant going through seppuku, a cruel suicide ritual that could only occur upon avenging those who had wronged their master.…

    • 1623 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Tokugawa Era of Japan

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Japan before the Tokugawa Era was a nation of warring states. The Tokugawa shoguns changed social class structures, agriculture, and manufacturing in the country by consolidating trends which had been in the making for some time (East Asia, p. 279) and brought Japan into a unified and productive state which lasted from about 1603 until 1800. Urbanization, economic growth, and social changes were natural and predictable outcomes of the shogunate philosophy.…

    • 928 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays