Essay On How Huck Finn Mature

Good Essays
Huck Finn was the main character of the book Huckleberry Finn. He definitely became way more mature throughout the book and it really shows. At the start he isn’t very much like everyone else around him. He just followed his own rules and did what he wanted to do without really putting in much thought about what his actions may do to others or how they may feel and react. He was a poor, homeless boy growing up and also acted very ignorant most of the time. He was just not important in the town or society he lived in. Towards the end of the story you will see a big change in the way he acts. Throughout the first portion of the book he was trying to escape his father, who was a drunk, mean old man.
Huck holds a closer relationship with Jim, a runaway slave, than most people who meet him do. Huck listens to Jim’s advice to better himself
…show more content…
When Huck was being raised he was taught that African Americans were property and their feelings and dreams did not matter to the white folk. After Huck had been living with Jim for a little while he began to realize he was taught wrong and he should not remain close to his previous beliefs. He now knows no matter what the skin color, people are people and should be treated equal. Huck realized himself and Jim are just alike in many ways and have many of the same beliefs, only Jim has black skin and not white. Near the first of the story after Huck had escaped his father he was taken into custody of Miss Watson, an old widow. After being adopted by Miss Watson Huck became involved with a boy named Tom Sawyer who decided he was going to start a gang, of which Huck would take part in. In order to become a member of the gang they had to swear that if they broke any rules of the gang then they would have to murder their own families. This was the time when the boys realized Huck did not have a real

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Jim helps Huck develop greater character changes throughout the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. In the story Huck learns a lot of lessons on how to grow into a better and more trustworthy friend. Jim helped him throughout the story to show him a different side of life, and how everyone is different and they grow in different surroundings. Jim and Huck both grew in maturity with their life, and wanted the best for one another. Huck finds out a new identity for the world as he grows later on in the story.…

    • 687 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Mark Twain’s book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck Finn was a troubled kid who grew up and matured in several ways. Huck ran away and had to learn how to make it on his own, and as he went on that journey of going from boyhood to adulthood he learned so much about doing the right thing.…

    • 785 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    In the novel, Mark Twain creates an interesting relationship between two seemingly opposite characters: a white boy and a black man. Right away, the reader realizes this relationship seems not only odd, but almost unlikely. As the story matures, the relationship between Huck and Jim matures as well. In the beginning of the book, Huck treats Jim as though Jim is not a human-being, but something sub-human with human-like qualities. More to the climax and conclusion of the book, Jim changes in Huck 's eyes. Huck now seems to regard Jim as a friend, supported by the fact that Huck did not have the heart to turn in the fugitive slave. This relationship is critical in the plot. Twain not only uses it to advance the story, but to address a rising national problem. The national need for companionship and re-bonding after the Civil War, not only to heal the wounds between the North and South, but between blacks and whites. Twain illustrates this need by making Jim become something of a father figure to Huck, a type of nurturing between men, essential for the survival of the nation. Twain sets the scene by showing that Jim felt he had an obligation to protect Huck on their adventure, especially when they enter the house floating on the…

    • 1165 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jim is the slave of the widow Douglas and Miss Watson, Huck’s guardians in the beginning of the book. A key part in Huckleberry Finn is how Huck is the only person who treats Jim like anyone else. Most see Jim as just another useless black man but to Huck, Jim is a very important man. Jim acts as the sort of father figure for Huck when they are flowing down the river. Although Huck was taught how to be friendly, Jim is friendly by nature. When Huck has “Gone Away,” Jim is genuinely concerned, saying "Goodness gracious, is dat you, Huck? En you ain' dead—you ain' drownded—you's back agin? It's too good for true, honey, it's too good for true. Lemme look at you chile, lemme feel o' you. No, you ain' dead! you's back agin, 'live en soun', jis de same ole Huck—de same ole Huck, thanks to goodness!" (15.19). Huck is confused but, he can see how much Jim cares for him. Huck is always very respectful towards Jim, which is a way most people did not act towards slaves at the time; Jim tells Huck that he was the only "white genlman dat ever kep' his promise to ole Jim" (16.16). Later on in the story, the two come across a boat, and on the boat was Huck’s dead father. Knowing how much this would upset Huck, Jim shielded Huck from seeing this by saying "It's a dead man. Yes, indeedy; naked, too. He's ben shot in de back. I reck'n he's ben dead two er three days. Come in, Huck, but doan' look at his face—it's too…

    • 897 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Mark Twain’s novel, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, is a coming of age story in which Twain manipulates his own ideas through to condemn the traditions that the South practiced and enforced during the time of the book’s publication. The viewpoint of the novel is narrated by the protagonist, Huckleberry Finn, through first-person narrator-participant point of view. Through Huck’s eyes, readers understand and judge the South as a whole, the faults within its systems, and the fortunate saving qualities. At the start of the novel, Huck immediately introduces himself to the audience, and he displays his character and voice through his viewpoint. Huck says, “You don’t know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom…

    • 1536 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Huckleberry Finn is a young boy who struggles with complex issues such as empathy, guilt, fear, and morality in Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn". There are two different sides to Huck. One is the subordinate, easily influenced boy whom he becomes when under the "guide" of Tom Sawyer. His other persona surfaces when he is on his own, thinking of his friendship with Jim and agonizing over which to trust: his heart or his conscience. When Huck's ongoing inner struggle with his own duality forces him to makes difficult and controversial choices, the reader sees a boy in the throes of moral development. And it is, indeed, a struggle. Although Huck believes in the rules of the harshly racist society in which he lives, a deeper and sounder part of him keeps making decisions that break those very same rules.…

    • 1735 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The novel ‘The Adventures of Huck Finn' by Mark Twain is a coming of age novel. Huck's maturity grows throughout the story. He first starts to show emotions toward a runaway slave, and by the end of the novel, has grown up to the point where, when Jim, the slave, is captured, Huck decides not to play games but to take it serious and rescue him the safest and most logical way. He also decides it give up playing games after his friend is shot to ensure that he would get the medical attention that he needed…

    • 611 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Huck Is a Non-Conformist

    • 1454 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Huck decides to hide Jim from any threatening strangers. Huck does not conform towards society's anti-black beliefs, and instead he stands strongly against harming them. During his rough journey on the river, Huck proves himself as a brave individual by not telling anyone that he is helping Jim escape. Huck risks his own life by lying to another white…

    • 1454 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    As Huck travels further with Jim, their bond grows stronger. He realizes how Jim and others are being mistreated and taken advantage of. Despite this, Huck was still bombarded with the idealisms proposing slavery. When faced with the options of turning Jim in or not, it was a difficult choice for him to make. With his decision to assist Jim in his escape, he was overcome by guilt and remorse, when in fact, morally this was the honorable and right choice. Unfortunately Huck only came to this conclusion from his feelings of guilt towards Jim. "Dah you goes, de ole true Huck; de on'y white genleman dat ever kep 'his promises to ole Jim." (page 124). Jim's loyalty to Huck was infinite and he put so much faith in Huck that he could not bear to betray Jim like that.…

    • 909 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Maturity is knowing when to do the right thing and following up on one's commitment even when he or she is tempted to do wrong. Huck Finn, in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, is faced with such temptations and situations where he is able to make the right choice and mature physically, mentally, and spiritually. He is able to avoid bad decisions, which leads him to become a more mature, established young man. Although Huck Finn finds himself acting immature at times, he still fully demonstrates maturity by the end of the novel.…

    • 885 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Children are born into perfect worlds, where they don’t have to worry about anything or anyone. As time goes by and life continues, they are affected by society and environment around them which allows them to think and get to their own conclusions about different aspects of the everyday life. Huck Finn is a very complex character in "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." He grows as a character through many different experiences and develops consciousness throughout the novel.…

    • 1068 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    From the beginning of the story to the end, Huckleberry Finn’s morals change rather dramatically and the novel focuses largely on this. Forced to reconcile his personal feelings of friendship for an escaped slave (Jim) with what society has told him is "right," Huck learns through the course of the story to trust his moral instincts. As the story progresses, we see Huck’s character develop strong morals that eventually lead to his reconciliation.…

    • 832 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Huck 's first moral dilemma comes when he meets Jim on Jackson Island. Huck 's initial reaction on hearing of Jim 's escape is one of shock; he could not believe someone could run away from their slave master. He cannot believe that Jim would stoop so low as to run away from his master, which he sees as a terrible sin. Huck does promise to keep his secret, however, despite knowing that "people will call him a low-down abolitionist and despise him for keeping mum" (57). Although Huck disagrees vehemently with the idea of runaway slaves, he likes Jim, and so he warns him that dogs are coming on to the island. This shows that Huck 's heart and his intentions are often in stir with one another when it comes to the topic of slavery.…

    • 919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Huck Finn Essay

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain was the first great American novel. Ernest Hemingway went as far as to say that "All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn". Mark Twain used literature to express his beliefs about American life and society. Huck Finn is a story of a young boy named Huckleberry Finn finding himself while traveling down the Mississippi River. Mark Twain uses Huck's journey towards maturity to convey his belief in the importance of being independent.…

    • 805 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Huck Finn

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Huck is always going against society and cannot live by its rules. Society told him it was wrong to help a runaway slave, but when he paddled out to go turn Jim in he just couldn't let himself. He decided that he didn't care what society thought was right, and that staying true to Jim was the best thing to do. "I knowed very well I had done wrong, and I see it warn't no use for me to try to learn to do right…Then I thought for a minute, and says to myself hold n; s'pose you'd ‘a' done right and give Jim up, would've you felt better than what you…

    • 941 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays