Preview

Essay On Gender Roles In Jane Eyre

Good Essays
Open Document
Open Document
519 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
Essay On Gender Roles In Jane Eyre
This essay will discuss gender in the way Rochester is changed from a lustful and fallen male who’s trail of mistress’ is long, to a man who is capable of seeing love beyond that of the laws and limits of his position. The evidence will be in the form of small quotes and scenes analyzed with the assistance of ‘Of Home and Love’ by Walter E Houghton. Rochester’s first impression in the novel is not one of much regard. Mrs. Fairfax informs Jane “Almost all the land in this neighbourhood, as far as you can see, has belonged to the Rochesters…” (Bronte 96). A typical characteristic of a Victorian male was land ownership. In the form of buying, inheriting, or marrying were the ways they acquired land. Rochester’s other characteristics also …show more content…
The first one of note is the scene where Rochester, Jane and Adele first have tea together. As she enters he speaks to her like a guest “Let Miss Eyre be seated” (Bronte 110). His manner is that of structure and business, he is very statuesque. He then continues to on asking Jane about her “residen[cy] in [his] house three months” (Bronte 111). His calling Jane a resident of his house is a manner that he would take with someone he did business with, much like a tenant. He conducts this tea like a business encounter and eventually scurries them off at 9pm for Adele’s bedtime. A short while later in the novel Rochester and Jane have a more intimate encounter. After a business meeting Rochester requests Adele and Jane’s presence downstairs. When he has done his part of being a “good host…[He] ought to be at liberty to attend to [his] own pleasure” (Bronte 119). At this point Rochester calls Jane over to sit near him, and as he watches the fire Jane examines him. Upon noticing Rochester asks “Miss Eyre…do you think me handsome” (Bronte 120). We begin to see his comfort with Jane, in that one would not assume a man to ask such a question of a woman, especially one that was his employee and was beneath

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Every topic in life can be portrayed as a controversial issue. There always have been two sides to every discussion and there always will be two sides. In the novel Jane Eyre, feminism is portrayed as the main controversial issue. In the early 19th century, women lived in a world that measures the likelihood of their success by the degree of their “marriageability”, which would have included their family connections, economic status and beauty. Women were also subject to the generally accepted standards and roles that society had placed upon them, which did not necessarily provide them with liberty, dignity or independence. This novel explores how Jane defies these cultural standards by her unwillingness to be defined by “marriageability”, unwillingness to submit herself to a man’s emotional power and her desire for independence while keeping her dignity.…

    • 859 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    We first encounter this relationship between Jane and Rochester during their first dramatic meeting. She encounters him when he falls off his horse and she is required to give him assistance. Jane’s first impression of his face is that ‘He had a dark face, with stern features and a heavy brow’. This may portray the dimness in his face awaiting to be enlightened by a woman which, in this case Jane. Further on in this chapter, unaware of who he is, on her return home, Jane is amazed to discover that the gentleman she assisted in the road was her employer, Mr. Edward Rochester. Jane’s future relationship with Rochester is most clearly set out in their first meeting. Although without any money, reserved and socially dependent, Jane is not afraid of this rather stern-looking man and approaches him confidently to offer her help. Rochester is given physical assistance and support, which is a target for the relationship that they may hold. In spite of her noticeable poor standard, Jane maintains the strength and power in relation to Rochester, the refusal to be dominated, which shows that she will always be the most dominating participant in this relationship.…

    • 2198 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Charlotte Bronte describes Rochester for the first time as being “middle height and considerable breadth of chest”, he has a well built figure which makes him appear strong and authoritative.…

    • 2273 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Jane Eyre Essay

    • 3572 Words
    • 15 Pages

    Compare and contrast the ways in which Bronte and Rhys construct the adult selves of Jane and Antoinette and consider how this shapes their relationship with Rochester.…

    • 3572 Words
    • 15 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The tale of forbidden love binds itself within many famous works of literature in order to provoke the human mind into situations similar to those of Adam and Eve of the Bible. The “forbidden fruit” plays an important role in the books of Ethan Frome and Jane Eyre in the form of unattainable but beloved women, where two men, Ethan Frome and Mr. Edward Rochester, share common distinguishable attributes. Their serene sensitive nature soon explodes into a passionate cause, later revealing a bare, desperate soul that longs for their beloved “forbidden fruit.”…

    • 930 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Hi, Grq Essay Example

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages

    6. Trace how Jane’s feelings towards Rochester change and develop in the following episodes of the novel:…

    • 649 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jane expresses her desire to be with Rochester when she says, "I'll not leave you on my own accord" (Bronte 546). This is the first time in the novel that Jane expresses content with who she is with where she is living. Jane describes her marriage by saying, "I am my husband's life as fully as he is mine. No woman was ever nearer to her mate than I am" (Bronte 554). It is evident that Jane feels a close connection with Rochester, and this is one of the first times in her life that she does not feel isolated from everyone she is with.…

    • 1141 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Both texts imply that there will be difficulties as the relationships are established. Charlotte Bronte presents a flourishing relationship between Jane and Mr Rochester; this is evident when Mr Rochester says ‘“My cherished preserver good night!” Strange energy was in his voice. Strange fire in his look.’ Charlotte Bronte uses passionate language to display the development of love between Jane and Mr Rochester. The word “cherished” underlines Mr Rochester genuine and tender feelings towards her. Charlotte Bronte has also used the word “fire” to describe the look in Mr Rochester’s eyes, Bronte has deliberately used this metaphor to symbolise the growing passion, developing between Jane and him. By this point, readers begin to feel and see the developing passion between Mr Rochester and Jane. Bronte gradually establishes the growing passion between the two, as within the ideologies of the Victorian era, Mr Rochester would have been expected to marry someone of his own social class; due to this Bronte challenges the Victorian reader to consider marriage outside a particular social class.…

    • 2171 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Jane Eyre comes into a position to marry Edward Rochester when she receives her inheritance. Prior to the inheritance, Rochester saw her as a "dependent," who always did "her duty" (Bronte 282). Jane even refers to Rochester as "master" and makes note of the separation of "wealth, caste, custom" between them (Bronte 282). She refers to her love for him as unavoidable and beyond the bounds of class. Rochester proposes marriage to Jane and becomes intent on transforming her into his view of ideal beauty. She resists and tells him, "you…

    • 1299 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    At Thornfield, Jane has finally found someone who loves and cherishes her fervently. Jane discovered that Mr. Rochester covered up his marital status and she felt betrayed and hurt by his deceit. After deciding unbendingly to leave Thornfield and Mr. Rochester behind, in this passage, Jane bids farewell to her master though Rochester continuously pleads for her to stay. From Rochester’s speech, he finally realizes that Jane is not going to yield to his wishes from her indomitable manner, but he still yearned for her to be by his side. Rochester passionately uses anaphora to emphasize that no matter how he implored Jane to stay, he vested no power over her. Besides Jane’s thirst for approval from others, another motif in the book is that she submits to no one and sacrifices her principles for nothing, such as her rejecting St. John’s proposal of marriage. Rochester juxtaposes the Jane that loved and treasured him to the Jane that repulsed and broke free of his love with an image of a “resolute, wild, free” and triumphant creature that refuses being controlled and held captive in its cage any longer. He also confessed that although he is the master of the house, he is not able to posses Jane’s self-willed soul. Jane’s character shines as she develops into a mature woman who dictates her own destiny. She would rather break free of Rochester’s…

    • 422 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In Charlotte Bronte’s, “Jane Eyre” the concept of the ideal Victorian male is severely challenged. Characteristics of loyalty, honour, wealth, moral uprightness, and intelligence are seen to be a part of an equation that equals the ideal Victorian male. However, these distinctive characteristics are deemed unrealistic and through Jane’s narration questions can be raised as to if any of the male characters in Jane Eyre match the “ideal Victorian male”. Male characters depicted in the novel such as John Reed, Rochester and St John Rivers appear to be greedy, dishonest, hypocritical and inconsistent within their ways. They break the ideal Victorian male characteristics and by the end of the novel the characteristics of a feminine hero outshines the male characteristics to create a new type hero for the time period. However, all three male characters in the novel contribute in Janes’ journey from childhood to adulthood and her transformation into a strong, heroic woman.…

    • 652 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Terry Eagleton states the "Jane 's relationship with Rochester is marked by ambiguities of equality, servitude, and independence". By examining pertinent incidents in the text, the validity of this statement will be shown, and moreover, these ambiguities will be shown to be of Jane 's own doing. It will be shown that she is the one who constantly thinks herself to be inferior, and even when she is said to be Rochester 's equal, she thinks of some way in which she is inadequate, in order to sabotage her own happiness.…

    • 1251 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jane Eyre Quotes

    • 2252 Words
    • 10 Pages

    While Rochester is purely motivated by passion, St. John is driven pure by practicality, seeing Jane as a potentially very strong missionary. Jane, on the other hand, is repulsed by the idea of a marriage with St. John, disliking both the idea of marrying someone she considers a brother and marrying a man of St. Johns character. Bronte’s use of St John’s proposal and Jane’s disagreement shows the conflict between the interests of St. John, a devout, spiritual man, and Jane.…

    • 2252 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    It is clear from the beginning of the chapter that Jane is frustrated by her situation within Thornfield. Whilst Bronte presents her situation within the household as one of comfort and that for many would breed contentedness, it becomes obvious that Jane’s passionate desire for more fulfillment in life, “more practical experience than I possessed” has caused restlessness. Jane’s philosophy that “human beings... must have action” acts as a precursor to the dramatic introduction of Mr Rochester to Jane.…

    • 1133 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Rochester is unlike the men she has previously encountered. He is the first man to treat Jane with kindness and include her at times when she would not normally be excluded. This was something Jane was not used to. Mr. Rochester treated her like a human being. Jane says of Mr. Rochester’s treatment of her, “There was a reviving pleasure in this intercourse, of a kind now tasted by me for the first time.” Mr. Rochester adds interest with the intellectual stimulation of their evening discussions, which she lacked. During these discussions, Jane stands up to Rochester saying, “I don’t think, sir, that you have a right to command me merely because you are older than I…your claim to superiority depends on the use you have made of your time and experience.” Jane’s identity and dignity are tester through the discovery of Mr. Rochester’s wife, Bertha Mason, at Thornfield Hall. She is the obstacle to Jane’s happiness because she does not only represent Jane’s repressed rage, but she is also the one thing preventing Jane and Mr. Rochester from being able to marry. To free Jane, Bertha must die, which happens after Jane has fled Thornfield and found the stability, belonging, and identity she longed and searched…

    • 422 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays