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The Hippopotamus
T.S Eliot

In T.S. Eliot's poem, The Hippopotamus, the first six lines of the poem, we can see the description of a hippopotamus. This Hippo is much like the human race because, we are simply made out of “flesh and blood.” Eliot utilizes religious reference in order to give us his point of view about religion and to picture them through the hippopotamus. , Eliot uses anaphora to show the importance of baptism and to be accepted as a Child of God. He also wants to explain how we should be forgiven for any sins that we might have committed in the past. He shows over and over his beliefs through the use of an animal that is known for being simple and boring. Hippopotamus lie around the entire day in the mud. Eliot continues to contrast the church with the hippopotamus, we can also see that the Hippo is too lazy and unmotivated to get better in its position in life so that they are simple creatures without worries. Eliot uses religious reference when he mentions the "True Church", "angels", "saints", and "the blood of the Lamb". Eliot mentions how the "blood of the Lamb shall wash him clean." This refers to rituals that are used in order to clean their sins. Once again, Eliot refers to the sins and how we should be forgiven because we are made of flesh and blood, and we are allowed to make mistakes. In the last three lines of the poem, you can see that the Hippopotamus has been taken into heaven with a lot of grace and glory even though its apathy and laziness. Even though of the Hippopotamus lack of ambition, God has forgiven him and has taken him into heaven. It also shows us that the Church will always be there for those who remain faithful. In conclusion, Eliot utilizes anaphora, repetition, and religious reference as a means of importance of having faith in God.

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