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Topics: Satyajit Ray, Cinema of India, Film Pages: 30 (9631 words) Published: June 18, 2013
Satyajit Ray
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Satyajit Ray|

A portrait of Satyajit Ray|
Born| (1921-05-02)2 May 1921
Calcutta, Bengal, British India|
Died| 23 April 1992(1992-04-23) (aged 70)
Calcutta, India|
Occupation| Film director, producer, screenwriter, writer, music director, lyricist| Years active| 1950–1992|
Influenced by| Rabindranath Tagore
Jean Renoir
Vittorio De Sica
John Ford[1]|
Influenced| Shyam Benegal
Martin Scorsese[2]
Bertrand Tavernier[3]
Alexander Payne[4]
Wes Anderson
Ismail Merchant[5]
Mira Nair[5]
Aparna Sen
Semih Kaplanoglu[6]
Tizza Covi[7]
Rainer Frimmel[7]
Aniruddha Roy Chowdhury[8]
Raghubir Sing|
Spouse(s)| Bijoya Das (m. 1949–1992)|
Signature| |
Satyajit Ray (Shôtôjit Rae,  listen (help·info); 2 May 1921 – 23 April 1992) was an Indian filmmaker, regarded as one of the greatest auteurs of world cinema. Ray was born in the city of Calcutta into a Bengali family prominent in the world of arts and literature. Starting his career as a commercial artist, Ray was drawn into independent filmmaking after meeting French filmmaker Jean Renoir and viewing Vittorio De Sica's Italian neorealist 1948 film Bicycle Thieves during a visit to London. Ray directed 36 films, including feature films, documentaries and shorts. He was also a fiction writer, publisher, illustrator, calligrapher, graphic designer and film critic. He authored several short stories and novels, primarily aimed at children and adolescents. Feluda, the sleuth, and Professor Shonku, the scientist in his science fiction stories, are popular fictional characters created by him. Ray's first film, Pather Panchali (1955), won eleven international prizes, including Best Human Documentary at the Cannes Film Festival. This film, Aparajito (1956) and Apur Sansar (1959) form The Apu Trilogy. Ray did the scripting, casting, scoring, and editing, and designed his own credit titles and publicity material. Ray received many major awards in his career, including 32 Indian National Film Awards, a number of awards at international film festivals and award ceremonies, and an Academy Award in 1992. The Government of India honoured him with the Bharat Ratna in 1992. Contents [hide]  * 1 Early life and background * 2 The Apu years (1950–59) * 3 From Devi to Charulata (1959–64) * 4 New directions (1965–82) * 5 The last phase (1983–92) * 6 Film craft * 7 Literary works * 8 Ray as Calligrapher * 9 Critical and popular response * 10 Legacy * 11 Awards, honours and recognitions * 12 The Ray family * 13 See also * 14 Notes * 15 References * 16 External links| Early life and background [edit]

| Satyajit Ray talks about his childhood daysMenu0:00A 3-minute 42 seconds excerpt from an interview of Satyajit Ray from the 1984 documentary film Satyajit Ray, The Filmmaker.| Problems listening to this file? See media help.|

Satyajit Ray's ancestry can be traced back for at least ten generations.[9] Ray's grandfather, Upendrakishore Ray was a writer, illustrator, philosopher, publisher, amateur astronomer and a leader of the Brahmo Samaj, a religious and social movement in nineteenth century Bengal. He also set up a printing press by the name of U. Ray and Sons, which formed a crucial backdrop to Satyajit's life. Sukumar Ray, Upendrakishore's son and father of Satyajit, was a pioneering Bengali writer of nonsense rhyme and children's literature, an illustrator and a critic. Ray was born to Sukumar and Suprabha Ray in Calcutta. Sukumar Ray died when Satyajit was barely three, and the family survived on Suprabha Ray's meager income. Ray studied at Ballygunge Government High School, Calcutta, and completed his BA in economics at Presidency College, Calcutta, though his interest was always in fine arts. In 1940, his mother insisted that he study at the Visva-Bharati University at Santiniketan, founded by Rabindranath Tagore. Ray was reluctant due to...

References: * Cooper, D (2000). The Cinema of Satyajit Ray: Between Tradition and Modernity. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-62980-2. .
* Dasgupta, C (1996). The cinema of Satyajit Ray. Penguin India. ISBN 0-14-024780-7. .
* Ganguly, S (2001). Satyajit Ray: In search of the modern. Indialog. ISBN 81-87981-04-0. .
* Ishaghpour, Y (2002). Satyajit Ray, l 'Orient et l 'Occident, Editions de la Différence, collection : Les essais, France. ISBN 2-7291-1401-7
* Mitra, S (1983)
* Nandy, A (1995). "Satyajit Ray 's Secret Guide to Exquisite Murders". The Savage Freud and Other Essays on Possible and Retrievable Selves. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-04410-4. .
* Nyce, B (1988). Satyajit Ray: A Study of His Films. Praeger Publishers. ISBN 0-275-92666-4. .
* Ray, S (1993). Our films, their films (3 ed.). Asia Book Corp of Amer. ISBN 0-86311-317-6. .
* Ray, S (1994). My Years with Apu. Viking. ISBN 0-670-86215-0. .
* Ray, S (2005). Speaking of films. Penguin India. ISBN 0-14-400026-1. .
* Robinson, A (2003). Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye: The Biography of a Master Film-Maker. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 1-86064-965-3. .
* Robinson, A (2005). Satyajit Ray: A Vision of Cinema. I. B. Tauris. ISBN 1-84511-074-9. .
* Rushdie, S (1992). Imaginary Homelands. Penguin. ISBN 0-14-014036-0. .
* Santas, Constantine (2002). Responding to film: A Text Guide for Students of Cinema Art. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 0-8304-1580-7. .
* Seton, Marie (1971). Satyajit Ray: Portrait of a director. Indiana University Press. ISBN 0-253-16815-5. .
* Wood, R (1972). The Apu trilogy. November Books Ltd. ISBN 0-85631-003-4. .
| |
Director & Writer | The Apu Trilogy | * Pather Panchali (1955) * Aparajito (1956) * The World of Apu (1959) |
| |
Goopy & Bagha | * Goopy Gyne Bagha Byne (1969) * Hirak Rajar Deshe (1980) |
| |
Calcutta Trilogy | * Pratidwandi (1970) * Seemabaddha (1971) * Jana Aranya (1976) |
| |
Feluda series | * Sonar Kella (1974) * Joi Baba Felunath (1978) |
| |
Documentaries | * Rabindranath Tagore (1961) * Two (1964) * Sikkim (1971) * The Inner Eye (1972) * Bala (1976) * Pikoo (1980) * Sukumar Ray (1987) |
Writer | Bankubabur Bandhu | * The Alien (1967) * Bankubabur Bandhu (2006) |
| |
Feluda series | * Baksho Rahashya (1996) * Bombaiyer Bombete (2003) * Kailashey Kelenkari (2007) * Tintorettor Jishu (2008) * Gorosthaney Sabdhan (2010) * Royal Bengal Rohosso (2011) |
| |
Other films | * Goopy Bagha Phire Elo (1991) * Target (1995) * Jekhane Bhooter Bhoy (2012) * Bombay Talkies (2013) |
|
| | |
* Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan (1954) * C
| |
1969–1980 | * Devika Rani Chaudhuri Roerich (1969) * B
| |
1981–2000 | * Naushad Ali (1981) * L
| |
2001–present | * Yash Chopra (2001) * Dev Anand (2002) * Mrinal Sen (2003) * Adoor Gopalakrishnan (2004) * Shyam Benegal (2005) * Tapan Sinha (2006) * Manna Dey (2007) * V
| |
1967–1980 | * Satyajit Ray (1967) * Satyajit Ray (1968) * Mrinal Sen (1969) * Satyajit Ray (1970) * Girish Karnad and B
| |
1981–2000 | * Aparna Sen (1981) * Utpalendu Chakrabarty (1982) * Mrinal Sen (1983) * Adoor Gopalakrishnan (1984) * Shyam Benegal (1985) * G
| |
Adapted | * Gopal Krishan Pai and Girish Kasaravalli (2009) * Anant Mahadevan and Sanjay Pawar (2010) * Avinash Deshpande Nigdi (2011) * Bhavesh Mandalia and Umesh Shukla (2012) |
| |
Dialogues | * Pandiraj (2009) * Sanjay Pawar (2010) * Girish Kulkarni (2011) * Anjali Menon (2012) |
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