Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate

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ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE | -AND ITS VARIATION | | ABSTRACT: The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), also branded as sedimentation rate or Biernacki Reaction, is the rate at which red blood cells sediment in a time of 1 hour. To execute the test, anti-coagulated blood is positioned in an erect tube, known as a Westergren tube, and the rate at which the red blood cells fall is calculated and accounted in millimeters per hour (mm/h). The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) is rarely the solitary evidence to infection in asymptomatic persons and is not a positive selection test. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) has been functional for diagnosis of prosthetic hip and knee infection. Result illustrated that ESR value ranges in such a way that average of female was found as 7.96% mm/ hr and that of male were to be 5.96% mm/hr. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate was strongly interrelated with age, haemoglobin level, smoking status, total cholesterol level and systolic blood pressure. | | -From the Desk Of Rabia Sehar | | |

OBJECTIVE:
To determine ESR variations --- in male and female.
INTRODUCTION:

The Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR), also branded as sedimentation rate or Biernacki Reaction, is the rate at which red blood cells sediment in a time of 1 hour. It is an ordinary hematology test that is a distracted evaluate of inflammation. To execute the test, anti-coagulated blood is positioned in an erect tube, known as a Westergren tube, and the rate at which the red blood cells fall is calculated and accounted in millimeters per hour (mm/h). This test was originated in 1897 by the Polish doctor Edmund Biernacki. In 1918, the Swedish pathologist Robert SannoFåhræus asserted the equivalent and beside with Alf VilhelmAlbertsson Westergren is eponymously considered for the Fåhræus-Westergren test (abbreviated



References: 4. P. J. GRANT; Erythrocyte sedimentation rate: is it a useful risk marker for coronary heart disease; European Heart Journal (2000) 21; 1567–1569 . 5 6. Wolfe F, Michaud K. The clinical and research significance of the erythrocyte sedimentation rate. J Rheumatol. 1994;21:1227–37. 7. Stuart J, Whicher JT. Tests for detecting and monitoring the acute phase response. Arch Dis Child. 1988;63:115–7. 8. Miettinen AK, Heinonen PK, Laippala P, Paavonen J. Test performance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein in assessing the severity of acute pelvic inflammatory disease. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1993;169:1143–9. 9. Katz PR, Karuza J, Gutman SI, Bartholomew W, Richman G. A comparison between erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and selected acute-phase proteins in the elderly. Am J Clin Pathol. 1990;94:637–40. 10. Wise CM, Agudelo CA, Chmelewski WL, McKnight KM. Temporal arteritis with low erythrocyte sedimentation rate: a review of five cases. Arthritis Rheum. 1991;34:1571–4. 11. Fauchald P, Rygvold O, Oystese B. Temporal arteritis and polymyalgia rheumatica: clinical and biopsy findings. Ann Intern Med. 1972;77:845–52. 12. G Erikssen, K Liestøl, J.V Bjørnholt, H Stormorken, E Thaulow and J Erikssen; Erythrocyte sedimentation rate; Eur Heart J (2000) 21 (19): 1614-1620. doi: 10.1053.euhj.2000.2148. 13

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