Ernest Hemingway

Topics: The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway, World War I / Pages: 18 (4261 words) / Published: Sep 9th, 2013
Gonzalez 1 Prompt: Many works of literature deal with political or social issues. Choose a novel or play that focuses on a political or social issue. Then write an essay in which you analyze how the author uses literary elements to explore this issue and explain how the issue contributes to the meaning of the work as a whole. Do not merely summarize the plot. Meagan Gonzalez Mrs. LeBas AP English Set 3 10 January 2012

Social Commentary in The Sun Also Rises Thesis: In the post-war novel The Sun Also Rises, Ernest Hemingway presents the disillusionment and cynical world view of the “Lost Generation” through the travels of American and British expatriates living in Europe after World War I. While money, alcohol, and sex act as the driving factors of his dissolute and hedonistic lifestyle, Jake Barnes struggles with the anguish resulting from the effect of his impotence on his relationship with and love of Lady Brett Ashley. The cynical and understated tone and repeated symbols of loss and death enhance Hemingway’s commentary on the effects of World War I on the young people involved. The novel addresses the dismissal of traditional values following the war through the terse structure full of seemingly insignificant detail and open dialogue on the motifs of alcohol and money. By establishing Jake and Brett as symbols of the redefined gender roles and creating situational irony in sexual encounters, Hemingway develops his social commentary on the new approaches of sexuality that emerged after World War I.

Gonzalez 2

I. Through the cynical and understated tone and recurring symbols of loss and death, Hemingway develops his social commentary on the aftermath of World War I in the lives of those involved. A. Tone and symbols of loss 1. Description of sequences of events with insignificant details • "At five o 'clock I was in the Hotel Crillon waiting for Brett. She was not there, so I sat down and wrote some letters. They were not very good letters but I hoped



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