Epstein Barr

Topics: Immune system, Cancer, AIDS Pages: 6 (1086 words) Published: June 15, 2013
Epstein-Barr Virus
Disease Information, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Epstein-Barr Virus
Disease Information, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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For more Information
www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/ebv.htm
www.emedicinehealth.com
www.uptodate.com

For more Information
www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/ebv.htm
www.emedicinehealth.com
www.uptodate.com

Treatment
* self-care at home for mononucleosis with rest, fluids, and over-the-counter pain medicines * avoid contact sports to prevent splenic rupture for one to two months * if necessary, steroids can be used to treat significant swelling in the throat or an enlarged spleen * for malignancies, chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, bone marrow and stem cell transplants, and surgery Treatment

* self-care at home for mononucleosis with rest, fluids, and over-the-counter pain medicines * avoid contact sports to prevent splenic rupture for one to two months * if necessary, steroids can be used to treat significant swelling in the throat or an enlarged spleen * for malignancies, chemotherapy, radiation, immunotherapy, bone marrow and stem cell transplants, and surgery 1) clinically diagnosed with symptoms and signs

2) lab tests indicating elevated white blood cell count, increased lymphocytes with greater than 10 percent atypical lymphocytes

3) positive heterophile antibody test

4) positive antibodies to the viral capsid antigen, the early antigen, and the EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA)

5) positive immunoglobulin M subclass (IgM) early in infection followed by increased immunoglobulin G subclass (IgG) occurs in two to four weeks after onset and persists for life

6) chest X-ray, CT scan of chest, abdomen, and pelvis

7) PET scan, bone marrow biopsy, and spinal fluid examination

8) clinically diagnosed with symptoms and signs

9) lab tests indicating elevated white blood cell count, increased lymphocytes with greater than 10 percent atypical lymphocytes

10) positive heterophile antibody test

11) positive antibodies to the viral capsid antigen, the early antigen, and the EBV nuclear antigen (EBNA)

12) positive immunoglobulin M subclass (IgM) early in infection followed by increased immunoglobulin G subclass (IgG) occurs in two to four weeks after onset and persists for life

13) chest X-ray, CT scan of chest, abdomen, and pelvis

14) PET scan, bone marrow biopsy, and spinal fluid examination

Diagnosis

Diagnosis

Symptoms
* sore throat
* fever
* swollen lymph nodes and tonsils
* fatigue
* headache
* loss of appetite
* rash
* loss of appetite
* weight loss

Symptoms
* sore throat
* fever
* swollen lymph nodes and tonsils
* fatigue
* headache
* loss of appetite
* rash
* loss of appetite
* weight loss

Symptoms & Signs
Symptoms & Signs

Epstein-Barr virus, commonly referred to as EBV, belongs to the Herpes virus family and is one of the common human viruses. It infects people worldwide and many contract infections with EBV at some point during their lives. In childhood, EBV usually causes no symptoms or very mild brief illnesses. In adolescence and young adults, the most common primary infection caused by EBV is infectious mononucleosis, also known as the “kissing disease” due to its oral transmission.

Humans are the only known reservoir for EBV and the virus can remain dormant in some cells of the body’s immune system. EBV is a human tumor virus...
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