Enkidu's Friendship In The Epic Of Gilgamesh

Good Essays
When the story, Gilgamesh, first begins the character is extremely arrogant, self-centered, and cruel. His friendship with Enkidu softens Gilgamesh into being a better person, yet their companionship makes him stronger and a better person. Before the friendship, Gilgamesh did not consider anyone else’s feelings and treated them as cruelly as he could for his amusement. Before Enkidu, no one in the kingdom had ever stood up to Gilgamesh, and he obviously had never been told no. A good example is Gilgamesh having sex with any woman that he wanted even brides on their wedding night and not thinking anything was morally wrong with that. Before Enkidu Gilgamesh had never cared about anyone or anything and he was the first person that he cared

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    The Epic of Gilgamesh is very complex, but it is also considered one of the greatest epics in the Western literature. In the story we can find several contradictions, from which I chose the friendship between Enkidu and Gilgamesh.…

    • 992 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    A hero is a genuine soul. He or she is always willing to risk his or her life for the safety of another. He or she has a need for things to be right in the world, but evil will always return. A hero she also possesses some extraordinary power or gift that a normal human being does not. It is very interesting when Gilgamesh is compared with Enkidu. It is easy to tell at the beginning of the story that Enkidu is going to be a hero. It takes a little bit longer for the reader to warm up to the idea of Gilgamesh becoming a hero.…

    • 527 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Epic of Gilgamesh

    • 857 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Epic of Gilgamesh is a third person journey about a man’s change from bad to good because of a character named Enkidu. Gilgamesh starts out a mean spirited, bitter, tyrant-like man and turns to a good humble like hero. Throughout the story different experiences and journeys lead Gilgamesh to this ending. On page 99, lines 2-50 Gilgamesh comes off as a cocky and selfish young king. In a way Gilgamesh cannot help but to be the selfish king that he is because, he came into this personality due to his upbringing and surroundings and his overall being. Gilgamesh is the handsomest, strongest, and most powerful man in the world. He also is two thirds god and his father was the king before him.…

    • 857 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Epic of Gilgamesh

    • 407 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Ever since the beginning of time, man has learned to mature by trials and tribulations. In the beginning of The Epic of Gilgamesh, the protagonist Gilgamesh appears to be an arrogant person who only cares about himself. He abuses all his powers and takes advantage of people with his physical abilities. Basically in the beginning he thinks that no one on earth is better than him. However, just like all epic poems, the protagonist encounters many challenges that make him a better person. So as the story progresses Gilgamesh slowly starts to change his personality. Various events help transform this tyrant to a humble person.…

    • 407 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Epic of Gilgamesh

    • 948 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In the Epic of Gilgamesh, Gilgamesh undertakes a journey of self-discovery and transformation from a tyrannical leader to a refined, mature and wiser king. The hero of Uruk, who is two-thirds god and one-third man, was introduced as the reigning monarch of Uruk who was a notorious rapist causing hatred and concern within in the kingdom. In the epic, his friendship and adventures undertaken with Enkidu, the death of Enkidu, and his failure to achieve immortality are key factors that led to the development of Gilgamesh 's character. By the end of the epic, Gilgamesh, who was initially antagonistically depicted as domineering, transforms into the wiser protagonist who has the courage to accept the notion of death and his fate as a mortal…

    • 948 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Epic of Gilgamesh

    • 1524 Words
    • 7 Pages

    The Epic of Gilgamesh is a tale from ancient Babylon. Its hero, Gilgamesh the king of Uruk, is two-thirds god and one-third man. Throughout the epic, which consists of three stories, the character of Gilgamesh is developed. This is accomplished by changing the vices he possesses at the start of the epic, and replacing them with virtues he receives by its completion. “A virtue is a quality of righteousness, goodness, or moral excellence; any good quality or admirable trait of a character.” (Halsey Collier’s Dictionary 1114) “A vice is an immoral or harmful habit or practice; fault or fall” (Halsey Collier’s Dictionary 1111). Gilgamesh is not the only character in the epic that partakes of vices and/or virtues. Other characters, including Utnapishtim [ the survivor of Great Flood], Ea [the god of water], and Enkidu [the friend of Gilgamesh] exhibit similar character traits. In all four of these characters, their actions are the reason they possess either vices or virtues.…

    • 1524 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Epic of Gilgamesh, suggests that the people of Mesopotamia expect their rulers to be strong, heroic, fearless, unselfish, and godly. Gilgamesh is said to be two-thirds god and one-thirds human, is described as being “strong, stately, and wise” and several times throughout the epic as “accomplished in strength”. However, not everyone sees the ruler as being great. Many believe that Gilgamesh exhibits many good characteristics but lacks generosity. The nobles at the beginning of the epic are one of those peoples who complain because Gilgamesh is acting tyrannically. They suggest that although they like how Gilgamesh is heroic and godly, they would like someone more democratic to be their ruler. In one part of the epic, Gilgamesh defeats…

    • 167 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Gilgamesh

    • 1205 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Gilgamesh was destined to perfection from birth. He was created as a divine mortal, two-thirds god and one third human. He was a man destined to live a lavish life with all the riches a man could ever want. Unfortunately, his arrogance and superior strength got in the way; in the beginning of the book one realizes that Gilgamesh is an arrogant person who needs to make it known he is the strongest, bravest man there could ever be. The men of Uruk would explain how, “Gilgamesh sounds the tocsin for his amusement, his arrogance has no bounds by day or night. No son is left with his father, for Gilgamesh takes them all, even the children; yet the king should be a shepherd to his people. His lust leaves no virgin to her lover, neither the warrior’s daughter nor the wife of the noble… (62).” The gods heard these cries from the people and the gods decided to create his equal, Enkidu. To challenge Gilgamesh in a battle, once the two started to grapple like wild bulls, once Gilgamesh had defeated Enkidu,…

    • 1205 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Heroism of Gilgamesh

    • 934 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Gilgamesh contains all of the superficial characteristics that are identical to heroes in other myths. “When the gods created Gilgamesh they gave him the perfect body and endowed him with beauty and courage” (61) giving him confidence to rule his kingdom without fear. Also, he was one-third man and two-thirds man, which gave him an advantage over others. Gilgamesh used these attributes for the wrong reasons making him the opposite of a true hero. In other words, he was arrogant and would purposely stir up trouble, such as “sacrificing” warriors and “raping” women. He took advantage of his traits and powers as king. Being that he never had a sense of overcoming a struggle nor competition, the gods created Enkidu in hopes of changing Gilgmesh’s views on life.…

    • 934 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In story begins with the people in Uruk describing Gilgamesh as an overly aggressive ruler who sacrifice his warriors during fights, rapes nobles’ wives, takes whatever he pleases and tramples anyone who gets in his way. (page 100, ln 1-50) To comply with his desires and restlessness, Gilgamesh sets off with Enkidu to slay the beast Humbaba hoping to gain fame. The other side of Gilgamesh begins to surface from this event, instead of a fearless and oppressive ruler that he was describe as, we can see Gilgamesh in fear trying to seeks for guidance. Surprisingly, Gilgamesh begins to face despair during his journey to battle Humbaba. Gilgamesh begins to make offerings to Shamash for help. Several dreams bring Gilgamesh doubts but with the reassurance from Enkidu, he is able to overcome the distress and defeat the demon Humbaba. “My friend, your dream is favorable, The dream is very precious as an omen… Further at dawn the word of Shamash will be in our favor.” (116: Lines 26-31) During this journey, not only did Gilgamesh experience fear but the feelings of brotherhood, love and compassion; Gilgamesh would speak to Enkidu about his fears and would embrace each other during the nights for warmth.…

    • 1149 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The story of The Epic of Gilgamesh is a western civilization historical poem that is mix of mythology and literature. It is to be believed was written around the first centuries of the second millennium B.C. considering one of the oldest, if not the oldest, ancient poem. It is about a hero who is desperate to become a god and goes an on quest for immortality. Within the pages of the old tale it reveals many hints of history, human nature, and myths of an ancient culture. Though the Sumerian Empire, the Mesopotamian culture, is long forgotten it has been told and retold by many for a reason. Is it because it’s similar views and culture? Is it because of its great story telling, its rich words? Or maybe because it enlighten the people historically? Though the tablets were founded by archaeologists in Middle East, it is a tale written by people of…

    • 897 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    It could be said that Gilgamesh should not have made friends with such a lowly monster, but Gilgamesh knew that he needed Enkidu. Neither of them cared about social status; they only knew they had to depend on each other.…

    • 612 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The Epic of Gilgamesh

    • 1293 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The story of Gilgamesh was one of the world’s first literary works but most importantly the very first epic. “An epic or heroic poem is a long narrative poem, on a serious subject [that was] written in a grand or elevated style, centered on a larger-than-life hero” (Lynch). Because it was only recited orally for many centuries it was forgotten and vanished until “it was recorded at Sumer in the late third millennium B.C.E” (Fiero 19). The story of Gilgamesh is about an arrogant ruler, who changes because of an immense love and friendship with his companion Enkidu, it is a story about the wisdom he acquires with his journeys, and the inevitability of death.…

    • 1293 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Gilgamesh and Odysseus

    • 1012 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Gilgamesh was a very self confident and at times that self confidence led to him to have little compassion for the people of Uruk at he beginning of the story. He was their king, but not their protector; he kills their sons and rapes their daughters. He felt like he was superior to others due to the fact that he was two-thirds…

    • 1012 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Gilgamesh Relationship

    • 676 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The relationships between Enkidu and Gilgamesh and the way in which they shaped each other’s lives comprise the central idea in the Epic of Gilgamesh. Two completely opposite characters were destined to become the closest of friends, and in a way, they complete one another. Despite their vastly different natures, Enkidu and Gilgamesh were true friends who cared for each other with an outlasting love that changed them both. Although one might argue that the relationship between them was sexual, the love they felt towards each other was in fact brotherly and represented a not atypical masculine relationship in Mesopotamia during that time.…

    • 676 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays