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English 250: Rhetorical Analysis

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English 250: Rhetorical Analysis
Youssef Kamal
English 250
Ashleigh Mills
3 May 2013

Reflection of English 250

After a year of focused work in English 250, I feel that I have developed the skill to articulate what I want to convey to the reader in multiple ways. My strengths as a reader have also definitely improved after reading the material we had this semester. We discussed several different aspects of the English language and spent a good amount of time this semester perfecting our ability to write rhetorical analyses. Doing so allowed us to focus a lot of our time on the WOVE method of communication and become better communicators.
Looking at my most recent paper, the research paper, I think that I have grown at organization and careful flow of thoughts. I used to just begin writing my papers without any plan or organization, but throughout this course we learned that you should base your paper around your thesis statement. The research paper I wrote was on the “The Medias Impact on Your Body Image”. I could have chosen an easier topic to research, considering that the opposing view was pretty controversial, but I felt I had acquired the skills that I needed to really learn and understand this complicated issue. Enrolling in this English class, I feel that have
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Until this course I’ve only attended a professors office hours once or twice. Throughout the drafting process, it was necessary to have a second pair of eyes critique my work and provide me with feedback of what I may be lacking. Also, I learned to value my peers throughout our presentations as well. The presentations not only helped me grow as a public speaker, but also as a respectful audience member and listener. I would like to contribute that to the WOVE method of communication as well; not only did the presentations helped me grow in all four departments, but they also helped me become a better

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