Ender's Game essay

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Ender’s Game Essay

In the novel Ender’s Game, the main character Ender expresses true leadership and possesses skills that enable him to exceed far beyond the average child his age. Throughout the novel many will see the transformation from a young 6 year old boy into a trained and highly respected hero. Although the outcome is great, however, the obstacles he had to overcome to become the person he is was extreme. In the beginning of the novel you are introduced to an outcast to society, however, the young boy with the name of Ender does not see it that way. He sees himself as different or unique in comparison to the other children due to the fact that he was a ‘Third’ and also had his monitor removed. Others started to notice that he was different as well such as his teachers, “They all knew of course, that he wasn’t paying attention”, even though his teacher knew this she still would not yet bother him due to the fact that no matter what “He always knew the answer”. (Card, page 2) By this many can infer that he was gifted and talented especially when it came to multitasking. Ender also used his mind for devious gifts; as his enemies would call out to him “Third”, then he would smile because he had “figured out how to send messes-even as his secret enemy called his name, the method of delivery praised him”. (Card, page 2) By doing this Ender displays a method of communicating in a satirical and humorous way far beyond his age group could but also in a way that still illustrates his childish remarks. The fact of how Ender learned his strategies displays an intelligence of one who may ‘think outside of the box’ which is exactly the kind of soldiers you need in a war. His creativity of using the Bugger’s ideas to his advantage proves to be effective. He proves that he is the only one capable of coming up with such strategies except he explains that he owes the credit to the Buggers-not the humans, however, " He felt ashamed and afraid of learning from

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