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PROJECT REPORT
ON
EMPLOYEE WELFARE AND SAFETY MEASURES
AT
VST INDUSTRIES LIMITED

SUBMITTED BY
MS.T.SRILATHA
HALL TICKET NO. - 160609672047

A project report submitted to OSMANIA UNIVERSITY in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of the degree of Master of Business Administration.

STANLEY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY FOR WOMEN
(Affiliated to Osmania University, Hyderabad)
(2009-2011)

PROJECT REPORT
ON
EMPLOYEE WELFARE AND SAFETY MEASURES
AT
VST INDUSTRIES LIMITED SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENT FOR THE AWARD OF THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

DECLARATION

I hereby declare that this Project Report titled Employee Welfare And Safety Measures submitted by me to the Department of Business Management, O.U., Hyderabad, is a bonafide work undertaken by me and it is not submitted to any other University or Institution for the award of any degree diploma / certificate or published any time before.

Name of the Student Signature of the Student T.Srilatha

CERTIFICATION

This is to certify that the Project Report titled Employee Welfare And Safety Measures submitted in partial fulfillment for the award of MBA Programme of Department of Business Management, O.U. Hyderabad, was carried out by T.Srilatha under my guidance. This has not been submitted to any other University or Institution for the award of any degree/diploma/certificate.

Name and the Guide Signature Of The Guide
Ms.Vasanthi.D

ABSTRACT

The project “Employee Welfare and Safety Measures” was done at “VST Industries Limited” to study the various welfare and safety facilities provided by VST Industries Limited to its employees. Employee welfare means anything done for the comfort and improvement, intellectual or social, of the employees over and above the wages paid which is not a necessity of the industry.”

This project attempts to study the welfare and safety measures provided at VST and to ascertain if they are being implemented effectively and also to find the data with a structured questionnaire that was given to the employees of VST.

The questionnaire consists of 30 closed and open ended questions and the responses were tabulated. Simple mathematical and statistical tools were used to analyze the data collected.
The data is analyzed and interpreted using pie and bar graphs. Based on the findings of this project, some suggestions have been made which if implemented will motivate employees and result in higher productivity.

ACKNOWLEDEMENT

I am deeply grateful to my guide Ms.VASANTHI for all the time she generously spent, sharing her ideas. I am indebted to VST INDUSTRIES LIMITED for the support over the months and in particular during the last year of my studies at Osmania University.

I would like to express my deep sense of gratitude towards Head of the Department and to my project guide Ms.VASANTHI DONTHI of Stanley College of Engineering and Technology for Women and Mr.K.Siva kumar (Industrial Relations Manager at VST Industries Ltd.), Ms.Syamala (Vice HR Manager at VST Industries Ltd.) for greatly inspiring me to take this live project.

Finally, it is foremost duty to thank my respondents, who helped me to complete my field work without which this project would not have been possible.

T.SRILATHA
(160609672047)

TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE No
1. CHAPTER - I
• Introduction to Study
• Objective of the Study
• Need and Importance of the Study
• Data Base
• Methodology
• Scope and Limitations of the Study

3. Chapter –II
• Literature Review

4. Chapter – III
• Industry Profile
• VST Industries Limited - Profile and history

5. Chapter - IV
• Welfare and safety measures in VST Industries Ltd.

6. Chapter – V
• Data Analysis and Interpretation

7. Chapter – VI
• Observations and recommendations

BIBLIOGRAPHY

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

EMPLOYEE WELFARE

Employee welfare defines as “efforts to make life worth living for workmen”. These efforts have their origin either in some statute formed by the state or in some local custom or in collective agreement or in the employer’s own initiative.
Welfare means faring or doing well. It is a comprehensive term refers to-
• Physical
• Mental
• Moral
• Emotional well being of an individual.
According to Todd “Employee welfare means anything done for the comfort and improvement, intellectual or social, of the employees over and above the wages paid which is not a necessity of the industry.”

SAFETY MEASURES
Safety is the state of being "safe", the condition of being protected against physical, social, spiritual, financial, political, emotional, occupational, psychological, educational or other types or consequences of failure, damage, error, accidents, harm or any other event which could be considered non-desirable. This can take the form of being protected from the event or from exposure to something that causes health or economical losses. It can include protection of people or of possessions.
SAFETY SERVICE
Employers provide their employees all safety equipments to working on machinery
1) To prevent from accident
2) By compensation in case of accidents
3) Provide first aid and medical assistance.

EMPLOYEE WELFARE IN INDIA The chapter on the Directive Principles of State Policy in our Constitution expresses the need for labour welfare thus:
1. The State shall strive to promote the welfare of the people by securing and protecting as effectively as it may a social order in which justice, social, economic and political, shall inform all the institutions of the national life.
2. That the citizens, men and women equally, have the right to an adequate means of livelihood;
3. That the ownership and control of the material resources are so distributed as to sub serve the common good.
1. The State shall make provision for securing just and humane conditions of work and for maternity relief.

FACTORIES ACT, 1948

The principal Act to provide for various labour welfare measures in India is the Factories Act, 1948. The Act applies to all establishments employing 10 or more workers where power is used and 20 or more workers where power is not used, and where a manufacturing process is being carried on.

Provisions of Factories Act 1948 for welfare
Provisions provided by Factories Act 1948 are: -
• Adequate, suitable and clean washing facilities separately for men and women workers.
• Facilities for storing and drying clothes.
• Canteens, if more than 250 workers are employed.
• Welfare officer, wherever more than 500 workers are employed.
• First aid boxes are provided.

Need And Importance Of Employee Welfare & Safety

Employee welfare measures increase the productivity of organization and promote healthy industrial relations thereby maintaining industrial peace.

Need of Employee Welfare
• To win over employee’s loyalty and increase their morale.
• To build up stable labor force, to reduce labor turnover and absenteeism.
• To develop efficiency and productivity among workers.
• To save oneself from heavy taxes on surplus profits.
• To earn goodwill and enhance public image.
• To make recruitment more effective (because these benefits add to job appeal).

Need For Safety Measures

Safety measures result in improving the conditions under which workers are employed and work. It improves not only their physical efficiency, but also provides protection to their life and limb. Inadequate provision of safety measures in factories may lead to increase in the number of accidents. Human failures due to carelessness, ignorance, inadequate skill, and improper supervision have also contributed to accidents, and the consequent need for safety measures. Other factors giving rise to the need for safety measures are:
• Rapid industrialization with its complexities in manufacturing process and layout;
• Expansion or modifications in existing factories;
• Setting up of new industries involving hazards not known earlier;
• Lack of safety consciousness on the part of both workers and management;
• Inadequate realization of the financial implications of accidents

OBJECTIVE OF STUDY

• To have an insight into employee welfare and safety measures in VST.
• To study and analyze the workers satisfaction levels regarding the welfare and safety provided by management.
• To determine whether the measures are implemented.
• To find areas of descend and give suggestions.

DATABASE

SOURCES OF DATA

The study is based on both primary and secondary data.
The main sources of primary data are workers of VST. The data collected through the primary sources mainly relate to the opinions of respondents regarding various aspects of Welfare Measures.

The sources of secondary data pertaining to the study are
• Memorandum of understanding between Union and Management.
• Annual Report of VST.
• Synopsis from various sections of Personnel Department.

METHODOLOGY

Sampling Survey - Questionnaire Method

A questionnaire has been designed to collect the primary data from the workers. The questionnaire consists of both open-ended and close-ended questions.

Research Technique

Simple mathematical and statistical tools are used for analysis of the data collected. The analysis of the data is graphically represented

SCOPE OF THE STUDY

The study is confined to the welfare and safety measures provided to the workers of VST. Employee welfare includes monitoring of working conditions, creation of industrial harmony through infrastructure for health, industrial relations and insurance against disease, accident and unemployment for the workers and their families. Welfare measures also include social insurance schemes. The study is limited to the employees of VST Industries Ld. It cannot be generalized to all organizations.

LIMITATIONS
1. The study will be a based on the data collected from report and Personnel Department and is interim for that particular period.

2. Busy schedule of my guide.

Chapter – II

LITERATURE REVIEW

EMPLOYEE WELFARE

Employee welfare includes monitoring of working conditions, creation of industrial harmony through infrastructure for health, industrial relations and insurance against disease, accident and unemployment for the workers and their families

Objectives of employee welfare

Employee welfare is in the interest of the employee, the employer and the society as a whole. The objectives of employee welfare are: -
* It improves the loyalty and morale of the employees.
* It reduces labor turnover and absenteeism.
* Welfare measures help to improve the goodwill and public image of the enterprise.
* It helps to improve industrial relations and industrial
Features of employee welfare

The features of employee welfare are: -
* Employee welfare is a comprehensive term including various services, facilities and amenities provided to employees for their betterment.
* The basic purpose in to improve the lot of the working class.
* Employee welfare is a dynamic concept.
* Employee welfare measures are also known as fringe benefits and services.
* Welfare measures may be both voluntary and statutory

Principles of Employee Welfare Service

Following are generally given as the principles to be followed in setting up a employee welfare service:
• The service should satisfy real needs of the workers. This means that the manager must first determine what the employee’s real needs are with the active participation of workers.
• The service should such as can be handled by cafeteria approach. Due to the difference in Sex, age, marital status, number of children, type of job and the income level of employees there are large differences in their choice of a particular benefit. This is known as the cafeteria approach. Such an approach individualizes the benefit system though it may be difficult to operate and administer.
• The employer should not assume a benevolent posture.
• The cost of the service should be calculate and its financing established on a sound basis.
• There should be periodical assessment or evaluation of the service and necessary timely on the basis of feedback.

Types of Employee Welfare Services

Safety Services

Prevention of accidents is an objective which requires o explanation.
The costs of accidents are enormous in suffering to the injured, in reduction or loss of earnings, in disabilities and incapacities which afflict those involved and in compensation, insurance and legal costs, in lost time, filling in reports and attending to enquiries, and in spoilage of materials, equipment and tools to management. Accidents are the consequence of two basic factors: technical and human. Technical factors include all engineering deficiencies, related to plant, tools material and general work environment. Thus, for example, improper lighting, inadequate ventilation, poor machine guarding and careless housekeeping are some hazards which may cause accidents. Human factors include all unsafe acts on the part of employees. An unsafe act is usually the result of carelessness. Young and new employees, because of their difficulty in adjusting to the work situation and to life in general, also have many more accidents than do old and nature workers.

The Phenomenon of Accident Proneness. Some persons believe wrongly in the theory that certain individuals are accident prone, that is , they have some personality trait as opposed to some characteristic of the environment which predisposes them to have more accidents than others in work condition where the risk of hazards is equal to all.

Components of a Safety Service

Among the many components of a safety service the following have proved effective when applied in combination:

• Appointment of safety officer
In big organizations, the appointment of a safety officer to head the safety department is a must. In small organizations, the personnel manager may look after the functions of this department. The head of the safety department, who is usually a staff man, is granted power to inspect the plant for unsafe condition, to promote sound safety practices (through posters an d safety campaigns), to make safety rules, and to report violations to the plant manager.

• Support by line management
The head of the safety department, whether enjoying a staff or a functional position, by him, cannot make a plan safe. His appointment lulls line management into assuming that all its safety problems have been solved.

• Elimination of hazards
Although complete elimination of all hazards is virtually impossibility but following steps can be taken to help reduce them:
• Job safety analysis
All job procedures and practices should be analyzed by an expert to discover hazards. he should then suggest changes in their motion patterns, sequence and the like.

• Placement
A poorly placed employee is more apt to incur injury than a properly placed employee. Employees should be placed on jobs only after carefully estimating and considering the job requirements with those which the individual apparently possesses.
• Personal protective equipment
Endless variety of personal safety equipment is available nowadays which can be used to prevent injuries.

• Safeguarding machinery
Guards must be securely fixed to all power driven machinery.

• Materials handling
Though often ignored, the careless handling of heavy and inflammable materials is an important source of several injuries and fire.

• Hand tools
Minor injuries often result from improperly using a good tool or using a poorly designed tool. Therefore, close supervision and instruction should be given to the employees on the proper tool to use an the proper use of the tool.

• Safety training, education and publicity
Safety training is concerned with developing safety skills, whereas safety education is concerned with increasing contest programmes, safety campaigns, suggestion awards, and various audiovisual aids can be considered as different forms of employee education.

• Safety inspection
An inspection by a trained individual or a committee to detect evidence of possible safety hazards (such as poor lighting, slippery floors, unguarded machines, faulty electrical installations, poor work methods and disregard of safety rules) is a very effective device to promote safety. Health Services The prevention of accident constitutes only on segment of the function of employee maintenance. Another equally important segment is the employee’s general health, both physical and mental. There are two aspects of industrial health services
1. Preventive
2. Curative, the former consists of
3. pre-employment and periodic medical examination,
4. removal or reduction of health hazards to the maximum extent possible,
5. Surveillance over certain classes of workers such as women, young persons and persons exposed to special risks.

Counseling Services An employee very often comes across problems which have emotional content. For example, he may be nearing retirement and feeling insecure or he may be getting promotion and feeling hesitant to shoulder increased responsibility or he may be worried due to some family problem.

STATUTORY WELFARE SCHEMES

The statutory welfare schemes include the following provisions:

1. Drinking Water: At all the working places safe hygienic drinking water should be provided.

2. Facilities for sitting: In every organization, especially factories, suitable seating arrangements are to be provided.

3. First aid appliances: First aid appliances are to be provided and should be readily assessable so that in case of any minor accident initial medication can be provided to the needed employee.

4. Latrines and Urinals: A sufficient number of latrines and urinals are to be provided in the office and factory premises and are also to be maintained in a neat and clean condition.

5. Canteen facilities: Cafeteria or canteens are to be provided by the employer so as to provide hygienic and nutritious food to the employees.

6. Spittoons: In every work place, such as ware houses, store places, in the dock area and office premises spittoons are to be provided in convenient places and same are to be maintained in a hygienic condition.

7. Lighting: Proper and sufficient lights are to be provided for employees so that they can work safely during the night shifts.

8. Washing places: Adequate washing places such as bathrooms, wash basins with tap and tap on the stand pipe are provided in the port area in the vicinity of the work places.

9. Changing rooms: Adequate changing rooms are to be provided for workers to change their cloth in the factory area and office premises. Adequate lockers are also provided to the workers to keep their clothes and belongings.

10. Rest rooms: Adequate numbers of restrooms are provided to the workers with provisions of water supply, wash basins, toilets, bathrooms, etc.

NON STATUTORY SCHEMES

Many non statutory welfare schemes may include the following schemes:

1. Personal Health Care (Regular medical check-ups): Some of the companies provide the facility for extensive health check-up

2. Flexi-time: The main objective of the flextime policy is to provide opportunity to employees to work with flexible working schedules. Flexible work schedules are initiated by employees and approved by management to meet business commitments while supporting employee personal life needs

3. Employee Assistance Programs: Various assistant programs are arranged like external counseling service so that employees or members of their immediate family can get counseling on various matters.

4. Harassment Policy: To protect an employee from harassments of any kind, guidelines are provided for proper action and also for protecting the aggrieved employee.

5. Maternity & Adoption Leave – Employees can avail maternity or adoption leaves. Paternity leave policies have also been introduced by various companies.

6. Medi-claim Insurance Scheme: This insurance scheme provides adequate insurance coverage of employees for expenses related to hospitalization due to illness, disease or injury or pregnancy.

7. Employee Referral Scheme: In several companies employee referral scheme is implemented to encourage employees to refer friends and relatives for employment in the organization

LABOUR WELFARE

Labour welfare refers to all those efforts of employers ,trade unions voluntary organizations and governmental agencies which help employees feel better and perform better.

The term welfare suggests the state of well being and implies wholesomeness of the human being. It is a desirable state of existence involving the mental, physical, moral and emotional factor of a person.

Adequate levels of earnings, safe and humane conditions of work and access to some minimum social security benefits are the major qualitative dimensions of employment which enhance quality of life of workers and their productivity. Institutional mechanisms exist for ensuring these to workers in the organized sector of the economy. These are being strengthened or expanded to the extent possible. However, workers in the unorganized sector, who constitute 90 per cent of the total workforce, by and large, do not have access to such benefits.
Labor welfare is the key to smooth employer-employee relations. In order to increase labor welfare, Employers offer extra incentives in the form of labour welfare schemes, and to make it possible to pursued workers to accept mechanization. Sometimes the employers to combat the influence of outside agencies on their employees, use labor welfare as a tool to minimize the effect they may have on the labour. labour welfare measures are also initiated with the view to avoiding payment of tax on surplus and to build up at the same time better relations with employees.

Approaches to Labour Welfare

Organization or employer introduce many welfare services for their employees, such as –
• Safety services
• Safety training, education and publicity
• Health services
• Skill development services (for personal development)
• Insurance services Etc.

Employee Welfare Officer Section 49 of the factories act provides that in every factory wherein 500 or more workers are ordinarily employed the employer shall appoint at least one welfare officer. The welfare officer should possess; (i) a university degree; (ii) degree or diploma in social service or social work or social welfare from a recognized institution; and (iii) adequate knowledge of the language spoken by the majority of the workers in the area where the factory is situated.
¯ Supervision
¯ Counseling workers
¯ Advising management
¯ Establishing liaison with workers
¯ Working with management and workers to improve productivity.
¯ Working with outside public to secure proper enforcement of various acts.

Health of Employees
• Cleanliness. Every factory shall be kept clean by daily sweeping or washing the floors and work rooms and by using disinfectant where necessary.

• Disposal of wastes and effluents. Effective arrangements shall be made for the disposal of wastes and for making them innocuous.

• Ventilation and temperature. Effective arrangements shall be made for ventilation and temperature so as to provide comfort to the workers and prevent injury to their health. • Dust and fume. Effective measures shall be taken to prevent the inhalation and accumulation of dust and fumes or other impurities at the work place. • Artificial humidification. The State Government shall make rules prescribing standard of humidification and methods to be adopted for this purpose. • Overcrowding. There shall be in every work room of a factory in existence on the date of commencement of this act at least 9.9cubic meters and of a factory built after the commencement of this act at least 4.2 cubic meters of space for every employee. • Lighting. The State Government may prescribe standards of sufficient and suitable lighting. • Drinking Water. There shall be effective arrangement for wholesome drinking water for workers at convenient points. • Latrines and urinals. There shall be sufficient number of latrines and urinals, clean, well-ventilated, conveniently situated and built according to prescribed standards separately for male and female workers. • Spittoons. There shall be sufficient number of spittoons placed at convenient places in the factory.

Welfare of Employees Chapter V of the factories Act contains provisions about the welfare of employees. These are as follows:
• There shall be separate and adequately screened washing facilities for the use of male and female employees.
• There shall be suitable places provided for clothing not worn during working hours and for the dying of wet clothing.
• There shall be suitable arrangement for all workers to sit for taking rest if they are obliged to work in a standing position.
• There shall be provided the required number of first-aid boxes or cupboard (at the rate of one for every 150 workers) equipped with the prescribed contents readily available during the working hours of the factory.
• The State Government may make rules requiring that in any specified factory employing more than 250 employees a canteen shall be provided and maintained by the occupier for the use of the employee.
• There shall be provided sufficiently lighted and ventilated lunch room if the number of employees ordinarily employed is more than 150.

Restrictions in the Factories Act on the employment of young persons:

1. Prohibition as to employment of children (Section 67)
No child who has not completed his fourteenth year shall be required or allowed to work in any factory.

2. Employment of Children and Adolescent (Section 68)
A child who has completed his fourteenth year or an adolescent shall not be required or allowed to work in any factory unless following conditions are fulfilled:
1. The manager of the factory has obtained a certificate of fitness granted to such young
2. While at work, such child or adolescent carries a token giving reference to such certificate.

3. Certificate of fitness (Section 69)
Before a young person is employed in the factory, a certifying surgeon has to certify that such person is fit for that work in the factory. Welfare Funds

In order to provide welfare facilities to the workers employed in mica, iron, ore, manganese ore and chrome ore, limestone and dolomite mines and in the beedi industry, the welfare funds have been established to supplement the efforts of the employers and the State Government under respective enactments. The welfare measures financed out of the funds relate to development of medical facilities, housing, supply of drinking water, support for education of dependents and recreation, etc.
Voluntary Benefits Benefits are also given voluntarily to workers by some progressive employers. These include loans for purchasing houses and for educating children, leave travel concession, fair price shops for essential commodities and loans to buy personal conveyance.
Machinery Connected with Employee Welfare Work
1. Chief inspector of Factories
It is the duty of the Chief inspector of factories (who generally works under the administrative control of the labour commissioner in each state) to ensure enforcement of various provisions of Factories Act i8n respect of safety, heath and welfare of workers.
2. Central Labour Institute
The institute was set up in Bombay in 1966 to facilitate the proper implementation of the Factories Act, 1948; to provide a centre of information for inspectors, employers, workers and others concerned with the well being of industrial labour and to stimulate interest in the application of the principles of industrial safety, health and welfare.
3. National Safety Council
The National Safety Council was wet up on 4th March, 1966 in Bombay at the initiative of the Union Ministry of Labour and Rehabilitation, Government of India, as an autonomous national body with the objective of generating developing and sustaining an movement of safety awareness at the national level.

4. Director General of Mines Safety
The Director General of Mines Safety enforces the Mines Act, 1952. He inspects electrical installation and machinery provided in the mines and determines the thickness of barriers of 2 adjacent mines in order to prevent spread of fire and danger of inundation.

Appraisal of Welfare Services
1. One of the main obstacles in the effective enforcement of the welfare provisions of the Factories Act has been the quantitative and qualitative inadequacy of the inspection staff.
2. at present, a labour welfare officer is not able to enforce laws independently because he has to work under the pressure of management.
Women workers do not make use of the crèche facilities either because they are dissuaded by the management to bring their children with them or because they have to face transport difficulties.

Agencies of employee welfare
The agencies of employee welfare are: -
1. Central government: - The central government has made elaborate provisions for the health, safety and welfare under Factories Act 1948, and Mines Act 1952. These acts provide for canteens, crèches, rest rooms, shelters etc.
2. State government: - Government in different states and Union Territories provide welfare facilities to workers. State government prescribes rules for the welfare of the workers and ensures compliance with the provisions under various labor laws.
3. Employers: - Employers in India in general looked upon welfare work as fruitless and barren though some of them indeed had done pioneering work.
4. Trade unions: - In India, trade unions have done little for the welfare of workers. But few sound and strong unions have been the pioneering in this respect. E.g. the Ahmedabad textiles labor association and the Mazdoor sabha, Kanpur.
5. Other agencies: - Some philanthropic, charitable d social service organizations like: - Seva Sadan society, Y.M.C.A., etc.

Employee Welfare and Social Security The connotation of the term “Social Security” varies from country to country with different political ideologies. In socialist countries, the avowed goal is complete protection to every citizen form the cradle to the grave. There are some components of Social Security:
• Medical care
• Sickness benefit
• Unemployment benefit
• Old-age benefit
• Employment injury benefit
• Family benefit
• Maternity benefit
• Invalidity benefit and
• Survivor’s benefit

Social Securities may be of two types
1. Social assistance under which the State finances the entire cost of the facilities and benefits provided.
2. Social insurance, under the State organizes the facilities financed by contributions form the workers and employers, with or without a subsidy from the state.

Social Security in India At present both types of social security schemes are in vogue in our country. Among the social assistance schemes are the most important. The social insurance method, which has gained much wider acceptance than the social assistance method, consists of the following enactments. The workmen’s Compensation Act, 1961. The Employee’s State Insurance Act, 1948. The employees’ State Insurance Act, 1948. The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961. Employees’ compensation Act, 1923
a. Coverage. This Act covers all workers employed in factories, mines, plantations, transport undertakings, construction works, railways, ships, circus and other hazardous occupations specified in schedule II of the Act.
The Act empowers the State Government to extend the coverage of the Act by adding any hazardous occupation to the list of such occupations is schedule II.
1. Administration. The Act is administered by the State Government which appoints Commissioners for this purpose under sec. 20 of the Act.
2. Benefits. Under the Act, compensation is payable by the employer to a workman for all personal injuries caused to him by accident arising out of and in the course of his employment which disable him for more than 3 days.
2. Employees’ State Insurance Act, 1948
1. Other than seasonal factories, run with power and employing 20 or more workers.
2. Administration. The Act is administered by the ESI corporation, an autonomous body consisting of representatives of the Central and State Governments, employers, employees, medical profession and parliament.
3. Benefits. The Act, which provides for a system of compulsory insurance, is a landmark in the history of social security legislation in India.
1. Medical Benefit. An insured person or (where medical benefit bas been extended to his family) a member of his family who requires medical treatment is entitled to receive medical benefit free of charge.
2. Sickness Benefit. An insured person, when he is sick, is also entitled to get sickness benefit at the standard benefit rate corresponding to his average daily wage.
3. An insured woman is entitled to receive maternity benefit (which is twice the sickness benefit rate) for all days on which she does not work for remaining during a period of 12 weeks of which not more than 6 weeks shall precede the expected date of confinement.
4. The Act makes a three-fold classification of injuries in the same way as is done in the workmen’s compensation Act.
5. Dependant’s Benefit. If an insured person meets with an accident in the course of his employment an dies as a result thereof, his dependants, i.e. his widow, legitimate or adopted sons and legitimate unmarried daughters get this benefit.
3. The Maternity Benefit Act, 1961
Maternity benefit is one of the important benefits provided under the
Employees State Insurance Act, 1948. Another important legislation in this respect is the Maternity Benefit Act, 1961. The Act covers only those persons who are not covered by the Employees State Insurance Act. The Act entitles a woman employee to claim maternity leave from her employer if she has actually worked for a period of at least 160 days in the 12 months immediately preceding the day of her expected delivery.
The act further provides for the payment of medical bonus of Rs. 250 to the confined woman worker.
The committee on the status of women in India 1974 has, therefore, recommended the following changes in the Act:
1. The administration of the fund should follow the pattern already established by the ESIC.
2. For casual labour a minimum of 3 months of service should be considered as qualification service for this benefit.
3. This will provide greater incentive to women workers to participate in trade union activities.
1. The Payment of Gratuity Act, 1972
1. Coverage. The Act applies to every factory, mine, oilfield, plantation, port and railway company and to every shop or establishment in which 10 or more persons are employed, or were employed, on any day of the preceding 12 months.
2. Administration. The Act is administered by a controlling authority appointed by the appropriate Government.
3. Benefits. Under the Act gratuity is payable to an employee on the termination of his employment after he has rendered continuous service for not less than five years. The completion of continuous service of five years is, however, not necessary where the termination of the employment is due to death or disablement Gratuity is payable at the rate of 15 days’ wages based on the rate of wages last drawn by the employee for every complete year of service or part thereof in excess of six months. But the amount of gratuity payable to an employee shall not exceed Rs. 3.5 lakhs.
4. Source of Funds. Under the Act gratuity is payable entirely by the Employer. For this purpose is required either (i) to obtain insurance with the Life Insurance Corporation, or (ii) to establish a gratuity fund. Thus it is his liability to pay the premium in the first case to make the contribution in the second case.

SAFETY MEASURES
Safety is the state of being "safe" (from French sauf), the condition of being protected against physical, social, spiritual, financial, political, emotional, occupational, psychological, educational or other types or consequences of failure, damage, error, accidents, harm or any other event which could be considered non-desirable.
Safety Training, Education and publicity

1) Safety training is concerned with developing safety skills ,
2) Safety is concerned with increasing contest programmes, safety campaigns ,suggestion awards, and various audiovisual aids,
3) Considered as different forms of employee education.
4) Related to employee‘s general health, both physical and mental.
5) Removal or reduction of health hazards to the maximum extent possible,
6) Pre-employment and periodic medical examinations.

National Commission on Employee Recommendations
1. The statutory provisions on safety are adequate for the time being effective enforcement is the current need.
2. Every fatal accident should thoroughly be enquired into and given wide publicity among workers.
3. Employers should play a more concerted role in safety and accident prevention programme and in arousing safety consciousness.
4. Safety should become a habit with the employers and workers instead of remaining a mere ritual as at present.
5. Unions should take at least as much interest in safety promotion as they take in claims for higher wages.

Safety Measures
Safety measures which are provided in the Factories Act, 1948, are considered to be minimum in terms of adequacy. Such measures are required to be effectively implemented. In addition to implementing safety measures provided in the Factories Act, there is also need for providing training in safety to workers, and installing safety equipment in the factories. Employers should take the initiative in providing training in safety to employees. Workers’ unions should take interest in safety promotion. Periodic training courses in accident prevention can be organised.Safety should become a habit with employers and the workers alike.

Provisions Regarding Employee Safety according to the Factories Act, 1948 (Act No. 63 of 1948), as amended by the Factories (Amendment) Act, 1987 (Act 20 of 1987)

The Factories Act provides for the following safety measures:—

(i) Fencing of Machinery
In every factory, measures should be taken for secured fencing of machinery. Safeguards of substantial construction must be raised and constantly maintained and kept in position while the parts of machinery (they are fencing) are in motion or in use.
Fencing is necessary in respect of:
— Every moving part of a prime mover;
— Headrace and tailrace of every water-wheel and water turbine; — Every part of an electric generator, a motor or a rotary convertor; — Every part of transmission machinery; and
— Every dangerous part of any other machinery.

(ii) Work on or near Machinery in Motion
Where in any factory, it becomes necessary to examine any part of machinery, while the machinery is in motion, such examination shall be carried out only by specially trained adult male workers. Such workers shall wear tight fitting clothing and their names shall be recorded in the register prescribed in this connection. The machinery in motion with which such workers would otherwise be liable to come in contact during the course of its examination, shall be securely fenced to prevent such contact. No woman or young person shall be allowed to clean, lubricate or adjust any part of a prime mover or transmission machinery, while the machinery is in motion.

(iii) Employment of Young Persons on Dangerous Machines
The Factories Act prohibits employment of young persons on certain types of machines as specified under Sec.23 of the Act. They can work only after they have been fully instructed as to the dangers arising in connection with the machines and the precautions to be observed. They should have received sufficient training in work at such machines. They should be under adequate supervision by a person who has a thorough knowledge and experience of the machines.

(iv) Striking Gear and Devices for cutting off Power
In every factory —
i) suitable striking gear or other efficient mechanical appliances shall be provided and maintained, and used to move driving belts to and from fast and loose pulleys which form part of transmission machinery. Such gear or appliances shall be so constructed, placed and maintained as to prevent the belt from creeping back on to the fast pulley. ii) driving belts when not in use, shall not be allowed to rest or ride upon shaft in motion. In every factory, suitable devices for cutting off power in

(v) Self-acting Machine
No traversing part of a self-acting machine in any factory, and no material carried thereon shall, if the space over which it runs, is a space cover which any person is liable to pass, whether in the course of his employment or otherwise, be allowed to run on its outward or inward traverse within a distance of 18 inches from any fixed structure which is not a part of the machine.This is to safeguard the workers from being injured by self-acting machines.

(vi) Casing of New Machinery
Every set screw, bolt or key on any revolving shaft, spindle, wheel, or pinion shall be so sunk, encased or otherwise effectively guarded as to prevent danger in all machinery driven by power and installed in the factory.
.
(vii) Prohibition of Employment of Women and Children near Cotton openers
No women or child shall be employed in any part of a factory where pressing a cotton–opener is at work.

(viii) Hoists and Lifts
In every factory—
i) Hoists and lifts shall be of good mechanical construction, sound material and of adequate strength; ii) They shall be properly maintained, and shall be thoroughly examined by a competent person at least once in every period of six months. A register shall be kept containing the prescribed particulars of each such examination;

(ix) Lifting Machines, Chains, Ropes and Lifting Tackles
‘Lifting machine’ means any crane, crab, winch, teagle, pulley block, gin wheel, and runway. ‘Lifting tackle’ means chain slings, rope slings, hooks, shackles and swivels. In every factory, following safety measures shall be adopted in respect of every lifting machine (other than a hoist and lift). (x) Revolving Machinery
Effective measures shall be taken in every factory to ensure that the safe working peripheral speed of every revolving vessel, cage, basket, flywheel, pulley disc or similar appliance driven by power is not exceeded. A notice indicating the maximum safe working peripheral speed of every revolving machinery shall be put up in every room in a factory in which the process of grinding is carried on.

(xi) Pressure Plant
If in any factory, any part of the plant or machinery used in a manufacturing process is operated at a pressure above atmospheric pressure, effective measures shall be taken to ensure that the safe working pressure of such part is not exceeded.

(xii) Floors, Stairs, and Means of Access
In every factory—
a) all floors, steps, stairs and passages shall be of sound construction and properly maintained, and where it is necessary to ensure safety, steps, stairs, and passages shall be provided with substantial hand rails; b) there shall, so far as is reasonably practicable, be provided, and maintained safe means of access to every place at which any person is at any time required to work.

(xiii) Pits, Sumps, openings in floor etc. which may be a source of danger, shall be either securely covered or securely fenced. Securely fencing a pit means covering or fencing it in such a way that it ceases to be a source of danger

(xiv) Excessive Weights
No person shall be employed in any factory to lift, carry or move any load so heavy as to be likely to cause him an injury.

(xv) Protection of Eyes
If the manufacturing process carried on in any factory is such that it involves (a) risk of injury to the eyes from particles thrown off in the course of the process or (b) risk to the eyes by reason of exposure to excessive lights, effective screens or suitable goggles shall be provided for the protection of persons employed on, or in the immediate nearness of, the process.

(xvi) Precautions against Dangerous Fumes and use of Portable Light
i) No person shall enter any chamber, tank, vat, pit, pipe or other confined space in a factory in which dangerous fumes are likely to be present to such an extent as to cause risk of persons being overcome thereby; ii) No portable electric light of voltage exceeding twenty four volts shall be permitted in any factory for use inside any confined space. Where the fumes present are likely to be inflammable no lamp or light, other than of flame–proof nature, shall be allowed to be used. iii) No person in any factory shall be allowed to enter any confined space, until all practicable measures have been taken to reverse any fumes which may be present and to prevent any ingress of fumes. iv) Suitable breathing apparatus, reviving apparatus and belts and ropes shall be kept in every factory for instant use. All such apparatus shall be periodically examined and certified by a competent person to be fit for use.
v) No person shall be permitted to enter in any factory, any boiler, furnace, chamber, tank, pipe, or other confined space for the purpose of working or making any examination until it has been sufficiently cooled by ventilation or otherwise to be safe for persons to enter.

(xvii) Explosive or Inflammable Dust, Gas etc.
If any manufacturing process in the factory produces dust, gas, fume, or vapour of such a nature as is likely to explode on ignition, measures shall be taken to prevent any such explosion by: — effective enclosure of the plant or machinery used in the process;
— removal or prevention of the accumulation of such dust, gas, fume or vapour;
— exclusion or effective enclosure of all possible source of ignition.
Measures shall also be adopted to restrict the spread and effects of the explosion by providing in the plant or machinery of chokes, baffles, vents, or other effective appliances.

(xviii) Precautions in case of fire
i) Every factory shall be provided with such means of escape in case of fire as may be prescribed; ii) In every factory, the doors affording exit from any room shall not be locked so that they can not be easily and immediately opened from the inside while any person is within the room, and all such doors, unless they are of sliding type, shall be constructed to open outwards. iii) Every door, window or other exit affording a means to escape in case of fire shall be distinctively marked in a language understood by the majority of the workers. Such marking should be in red letters of adequate size or by some other effective and clearly understood sign. iv) An effective and clearly audible means of giving warning, in case of fire, to every person shall be provided in the factory.
v) A free passage–way giving access to each means of escape in case of fire shall be maintained for the use of all workers in the factory. vi) Effective measures shall be taken to ensure that in every factory all workers are familiar with the means of escape in case of fire and have been adequately trained in the routine to be followed in such a case.

(xix) Safety of Building and Machinery
In case it appears that any building, machinery or plant in a factory is in such a condition that it is dangerous to human life or safety, the manager of the factory may be served an order specifying measures to be adopted as prescribed. Further, in case it appears that the use of any building, machinery or plant in a factory involves imminent danger to human life or safety, an order may be served prohibiting the use of such building or machinery, until it has been repaired or altered.

Chapter III

INDUSTRY PROFILE

VST INDUSTRIES LIMITED – A PROFILE

The study involves looking at employee welfare and safety measures at VST Industries Limited which is in the Tobacco Industry. Before looking at a brief profile of the company, detailing its origin, growth, operations etc, let us have a look on the Tobacco Industry itself.

TOBACCO INDUSTRY: The cigarette industry occupies a unique position. Tobacco is a major commercial crop in India. The Portuguese introduced tobacco in India in 16th century.

Today India is the largest tobacco producing country in the world. The first company to enter the Indian market was Imperial Tobacco which promoted the sales of both imported and indigenously manufactured cigarettes over the unit at maniler.

Tobacco owned its popularity due to increased government revenues with the acceptance and consequent growth in demand with time, multiple entered the market which gave rise to fierce competition among the manufacturers .The tobacco is sold to the exporters and the Indian cigarette producers.

At auctions in tobacco growing states of Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, And Orissa.
The growth and future of cigarette industry is unpredictable. The cigarette and tobacco players face increasing protests from anti-tobacco and health organizations globally as well as in India. The anti-tobacco lobbying has gained ground.

The cigarette industry is facing immense pressure with declining volumes and increasing government regulations and taxation.

The cigarette industry is segmented into 5 categories:
1. Plain
2. Macro
3. Regular filter
4. Longs
5. King size filter.

Regular filter is the biggest segment and accounts for around 47% of the total market.

MAJOR TOBACCO INDUSTRIES IN THE COUNTRY

1. INDIAN TOBACCO COMPANY LIMITED:
ITC Limited is the first which offered the taste of tobacco in the form of a cigarette to the Indian smoker. It was started as an Imperial Tobacco company to cater the need of the British Indian Officials and Royal families.
ITC Limited has 75%percent share in the total tobacco market and is the leader of the market. It has a number of successful brands in the portfolio which are spred across the various segments of the cigarette market.

ITC brands are:
1. Gold Flake Honey Dew Filter Kings
2. Gold Flake Filter (small)
3. Wills-Navy Cut
4. Bristol
5. Berkley
6. Capstan
7. India Kings
8. Classic
9. Scissors
ITC Limited always enjoys the regular demand for its products.

2. GODFREY PHILIPS INDIA LIMITED:

GPI Limited occupies second position. Its holds 12% share of the overall cigarette market. Its popular brands are:
1. Four Square Premier
2. Cavandar Plain
3. Rothmans
4. Jaisalmer (Premium Brand)
5. Chaster Fields
6. Red White
3. VST INDUSTRIES LIMITED:
VST INDUSTRIES LIMITED occupies the third position by holding 8% share of the total cigarette market. It captured that part of the society which forms majority in number by catering to the lower income segment and established a firm base among the masses by offering low priced and good quality cigarette. VST INDUSTRIES LIMITED shouldered the social responsibility by encouraging sports and by organizing music concerts which helps to retain Indian cultural identity.
VST popular brands are:
1. CLUB CUTSPECIAL 10HL
2. SPECIAL EXTRA SMOOTH 10HL
3. CHARMINAR FILTER 10SS
4. CHARMINAR FILTER 10HL
5. CHARMS SMOOTH VIRGINIA FILTER 10HL
6. CHARMS PREMIUM FILTER 10HL
7. CHARMINAR SPECIAL MILD VIRG. FILTER 10HL
8. CHARMS VIRGINIA FT 10HL
9. MOMENTS 10HL
10. CHARMS MINTY FRESH 10HL
11. GOLD PREMIUM FT 10SS
12. CHARMS BLUES FT 10HL
13. CHARMINAR GOLD FT 10HL
14. CHARMINAR 10HL
15. CHARMS FILTER 10SS
16. CHARMINAR STANDARD 10SS
4. GOLDEN TOBACCO COMPANY LIMITED:
GTC Limited also plays an important role in cigarette industry. Its popular brands are:
1. Chancellor
2. Panama

Now a brief profile of VST Industries Limited, at which the present study was undertaken, is given as under:

HISTORY AND ORIGIN OF VST:

1930: 10 November
• VST company was registered with one lakh shares.
• Manpower 2769 people
• 1st Brand Charminar.
Historical background of the company:
The Vazir Sultan Tobacco Company Limited was started in 1930.In the early 1920, a person by name, Abdul Razak came to Hyderabad from Bangalore with an enthusiasm of setting up a Tobacco Industry to manufacture cigarettes. But Abdul Razak was falling short of finance. So he approached various businessmen for aid. At last, his efforts came to realize when a noble by name Mohd Vazir and his son Mohd Sultan agreed to provide the finance. In 1925, the foundation was laid with the name “Vazir Sultan and Sons” at Narayanguda, Hyderabad.
The promoters then sought the permission of the Nizam of Hyderabad for using the name and emblem of CHARMINAR as a brand name.
In 1930 the rights of Vazir Sultan and Sons were registered under the Companies Act under the name of THE VAZIR SULTAN TOBACCO COMPANY LIMITED.
The outbreak of World War II was a blessing in disguise for the company. During the war, Armed forces were mobilized from Hyderabad to all parts of the country. These soldiers carried Charminar Cigarette with them and thus Charminar rose in popularity.
ORGANIZATION PROFILE:
VST Industries Limited is the third largest cigarette company with an annual turnover of around turnover of around rupees six thousand million, is situated Hyderabad, capital of Andhra Pradesh. The factory was established in November ,1930 and over the years it has grown into a major industry. Charminar and Charm cigarette ,are the key brands produced by this industry. The exports cut tobacco and cigarettes to different countries. VST is an associate company of British American Tobacco Industries, UK. The company adopts best practice and is the lives of business and considers social responsibilities as a prime consider action in the part of business transactions. It is an organization known for the industry of its business principles, pioneering efforts and in agricultural extension activities, brand marketing and advertising, technological excellence as well as service to its customers. The company has excellent relations with state and central government, banks and financial institution, trade unions, farmers, trade and distributing channels and consumers. VST is a strong player in the price segment and that too in the eastern and north eastern markets. The company launched a line extension in the form of charms mini and novelist pack, the other brands are charminar’s special filter, Charminar plain performed well. The company has its own marketing department with six regional offices each located at South central- Hyderabad, South-Bangalore, West-Mumbai, East-Kolkata, North east-Guwahati, North-Delhi, and Central-Bhopal.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Chairman

ABHIJIT BASU

Managing Director

RAYMOND S. NORONHA

Deputy Managing Director & Secretary

N. SAI SANKAR

Directors

PETER G. HENRIQUES (Appointed w.e.f. 15th April, 2010)
JAYAMPATHI DIVALE BANDARANAYAKE (Resigned w.e.f. 15th April, 2010)
AIR CHIEF MARSHAL IDRIS HASAN LATIF, P.V.S.M. (Retd.) (Resigned w.e.f. 16th April, 2010)
T. LAKSHMANAN
MILIND ANNA KHARAT
R.V.K.M. SURYARAU
S. THIRUMALAI

VST – AN AGRO BASED INDUSTRY:
VST begins basically in agro business field with tobacco, as a major raw material has been deeply involved with farmers and agricultural extension praogrammers. At present 2,00,000 acres are covered by VST farmer advisory services and an excellent rapport has been build up with almost 30,000 farmers. The factory is situated in Azamabad on 14.14 acres of land, housing its registered office and manufacturing blocks. It employee’s 1088 persons and gives indirect employment to persons by way to contractual works, farming and leaf growing. The companies pay Rs.620 crores approximately annually by way of excise duty to the government. Primary manufacturing Department (PMD), Secondary manufacturing Department (SMD) are two important block for processing cut tobacco and marketing cigarettes respectively. The modernized plant produces 47 tons high quality cut tobacco daily. It is well laid out ensuring ventilation and illumination state of the act techniques are employed in new machines with PLC control and variable frequency drives for conservation of energy. Equipment are provided with class 3 & 4 guarding systems to ensure maximum safety to the operating personnel, dust recovery filter units and inclinators are provided as a part of pollution control measure to control dust and odour respectively. It has been a pioneer in introducing crop insurance and spreading the braking habit tobacco farmers. In 1970, due to liberalization of FERA, VST Industries Limited decided to expand its producing its application was rejected by the government as more than 50% of the equity was held by BATCO. It was then that company shares fell down by 35% with the even increasing demand; the technology was also updated keeping in view the changing times. Today its primary manufacturing unit is considered as the most modern in the whole Asia. In 2008, it incorporated large GD-121 and Loga 85D machinery imported from Germany and Italy to its factory which produces around 12,000 cigarettes as against 7,000 cigarettes per minute which the existing machines are manufacturing.
VST’S PLACE IN INDIAN INDUSTRY:
It is an organization known for the integrity of its business principles pioneering efforts in agricultural activities, brand marketing and advertising, technological excellence, social responsibility and promotion of sports and music as well as service to its customers. This has enabled VST to maintain excellent relationship with the state and national government, banks and financial institutions, trade unions, farmers and distribution channels, and its customers. VST is the third largest industry in producing cigarette.

FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE OF THE COMPANY:
Report of the Board of Directors & Management
Discussion and Analysis for The Year Ended 31 March, 2010

Financial Results Rs. Lakhs 2009-10 2008-09

Revenue from Operations 112542 100474
Net Profit after Tax 6205 6182
Profit brought forward from previous year 8200 8063
Balance available for Appropriation 14405 14245
Amount transferred to General Reserves 625 625
Dividend proposed 4632 4632
Corporate Dividend Tax 770 788
Surplus carried in Profit and Loss Account 8378 8200

KEY RATIOS
Earnings per Share (Rs.) 40.18 40.04
Dividend per Share (Rs.) 30.00 30.00

ORGANIZATION STRUCTURE OF THE COMPANY MENTIONED HERE UNDER:

ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH & SAFETY:

The company considers safety, as an integral part of Environment, Health & safety management system in its various business operations.

The company adopted Integrated Environment, Health & safety management guidelines in 1997, which were similar to ISO 14001 & OHSAS 18001 guidelines. Having implemented and monitored for 7 years, the company got certification from ISO 14001:2004 and OHSAS 18001:2007 in November 2004 and SA 8000 in 2007 for its leaf areas.

EHS IMPLEMENTATION

EHS Implementation is guided by the following module similar to PDCA approach of ISO standards. It is guided by 27 elements; these are planned and monitored quarterly to achieve a high level of performance.

WORKER’S PARTICIPATION A Technical EHS committee is constituted with the workmen and management staff to discuss and take actions foe improvement in the departmental EHS performance. Workmen are actively involved in all safety programmers and EHS audits.

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH FACILITIES

There is fully fledged Health Care Centre manned by doctors and compounders round the clock and equipped with life saving equipments and drugs. An ambulance van is available In case of emergency.

Chapter IV

Welfare and Safety Measures In VST Industries Limited

WELFARE MEASURES FOLLOWED AT VST:

As per the Memorandum of settlement dated 16-06-2010, the welfare measures followed are:

1. House Rent Allowance:
It is agreed that HRA of Rs.4000 per month will be paid to all the workmen who are on the rolls of the company.
No rent allowance will be payable to the workmen for the period of suspension under factory standing orders and for days of strike.

2. Medical Allowance: It is agreed that all the workmen covered by this settlement will continue to receive Rs.500 per month excluding the over time, extra time, weekly off, festival holiday.
No rent allowance will be payable to the workmen for the period of suspension under factory standing orders and for days of strike.

3. Fixed Dearness Allowance: The fixed dearness allowance will be paid as per Clause 11 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.

4. Variable Dearness Allowance:
All the workmen who are on the rolls of the company will be paid variable dearness allowance linked to the consumer price index of Hyderabad center received from the bureau of economics and statistics government of Andhra Pradesh.
The VDA will be payable at a rate of Rs.3.52 per point rise over and above 3733 points of index.

5. Washing Allowance:
It is agreed that all the workmen covered by this settlement will continue to receive Rs.150 per month as washing allowance.
This allowance is not paid to the workmen for their absence without pay, strike, suspensions.

6. Pension Scheme: The pension scheme is laid down in Clause 14 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.

7. Annual Productivity Bonus:
The payment of annual productivity bonus shall be payable under the Payment of Bonus Act 1965 or otherwise based on the profits and all other industrial bonus of whatsoever in nature.

8. Gratuity: All the workmen covered under the Payment of Gratuity Act 1972, shall be paid gratuity in accordance with the provisions of the said act.

9. Annual Leave:
The annual leave will be entitled according to the Clause 17 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.

10. Sick Leave, Accident leave, Hospitalization Insurance & Reimbursement of medical expenses to Non-ESI workmen:
The sick Leave, accident leave, hospitalization insurance & reimbursement of medical expenses to non-ESI workmen will be entitled according to the Clause 18(I) to (V) of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.

11. National & Festival Holidays:
The national & festival holidays will be entitled according to the Clause 19 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.

12. Casual Leave:
The casual leave will be entitled according to the Clause 20 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.
Cash equivalent of casual leave to be encashed as at 31st December of each year shall be calculated on the base of basic wage & VDA applicable to the month of December of that year.
All kinds of leave have to be applied for approval from the respective superior otherwise treated as unauthorized absence.

13. Free Meal or Limited Snacks Service in Canteen:
The free meal or limited snacks service in canteen will be provided according to the Clause 21 & Annexure 5 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.

14. Quality:
Both management and union recognize the production as an increasingly competitive tool to acquire or protect market share. In order to build quality into process and the product the concept of “Do it Right, First Time” has been introduced.

15. Travelling Expenses:
Subject to the rules in this regard and only when workmen travel on company business overnight outside their normal place of work will continue to receive the travel expenses at the following rates:

Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata, Bangalore: Rs.600 per day
Non metro cities or towns : Rs.450 per day
Consolidated TE : Rs.150 per day

Mode of Travel: First class or 3 tier AC train fare or bus fare by the shortest route will be given.

16. Night Shift or Late Shift Allowance: The night shift or late shift allowance will be entitled according to the Clause 30 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02-2007.

17. Long service Award: The company awards
Rs.15000 for the employees after 25 years of service completion.
Rs.15000 for the Ex-serviceman (security) after 20 years of service completion.

18. Lunch Allowance: All the workmen who are on the rolls of the company will be entitled to receive lunch allowance of Rs.60.
No lunch allowance to workman who is in the receipt of travelling expense during concerned period.

19. Attendance Incentive: The attendance incentive will be entitled according to the Clause 33 of Memorandum of settlement dated 05-02.

20. Leave Travel Allowance: All the workmen who are on the rolls of the company will be entitled 7days annual leave an LTA. Scale 1 to 4: Rs.6000 Scale 5 to 11: Rs.6330
LTA is paid along with the salary during the month of May every year.

21. Medical Check up: The Company will make the arrangements for the medical checkup of the workman based on the following procedure:

AGE GROUP PERIODICITY OF CHECKUP Above 50 yrs once in a year 45-50 yrs once in two years Below 45 yrs once in three years

22. Uniform: It is agreed that workman covered under this settlement will be provided with two sets of Terri-cotton for every calendar year. It is also agreed that stitching charges Rs.300 per set of uniform will be paid to each worker.

23. Safety Shoes: One set of safety shoes and two pairs of socks once a year is provided to all permanent workers and it is compulsory for them to wear while reporting for duty.

24. Education Allowance: All the workmen who are on the rolls of the company will be entitled to receive education allowance of Rs.425 per month.

25. Loans To Co-Operative Societies Of Workman: It is agreed that the company will give advance loans not exceeding a maximum aggregate total of Rs.4000000 in four installments during the period of the settlement of the following societies namely:
• The VST company workers cooperative housing society Ltd.
• The VST company workers provident and mutual aid cooperative society Ltd
• The Vazir employee consumer cooperative society Ltd.

26. Benefits to Deceased Worker’s Family: In the event of death of the workman in the service, Rs.5 lakhs shall be paid to the legal heir and Rs.30000 toward funeral expenses.

27. Special Allowance: All the workmen who are on the rolls of the company will be entitled to receive special allowance of Rs.100 per month.

28. Conveyance Allowance: All the workmen who are on the rolls of the company will be entitled to receive conveyance allowance of Rs.1850 per month.

29. Family Planning: The Company would like to encourage the employees to undergo vasectomy operation and such workers will be entitled six days special leave with pay and gift of Rs.6000 provided if they do not have more than two children.

30. Superannuation Benefits: Retirement fund payment
It is hereby agrees that to receive retirement fund each worker shall contribute a sum not exceeding Rs.40 to the workman who is retiring. The company will also contribute twice the amount such collected and will be paid along with the final settlement.

31. Gift Cheque: With effect from the date of signing of the settlement workmen who retire attaining the age of suspension will be entitled to a gift cheque of Rs.2500 which will be presented to them on the date of retirement.

Other welfare measures:

1. Drinking Water: At all the working places safe hygienic drinking water is provided for the workers.

2. First aid appliances: First aid appliances are provided and are readily assessable so that in case of any minor accident initial medication can be provided to the needed employee.

3. Canteen facilities: Cafeteria or canteens are provided by the employer so as to provide hygienic and nutritious food to the employees.

4. Spittoons: In every work place, such as ware houses, store places, and office premises spittoons are provided in convenient places and the same are to be maintained in a hygienic condition.

5. Rest rooms: Adequate numbers of restrooms are provided to the workers with provisions of water supply, wash basins, toilets, bathrooms, etc.

Employee Welfare Officer:

The Company has appointed a welfare officer for supervision, counseling workers, advising management, establishing liaison with workers, working with management and workers to improve productivity, working with outside public to secure proper enforcement of various acts.

Chapter V

DATA ANALYSIS
AND
INTERPRETATION

SATISFACTION LEVELS OF WELFARE MEASURES

(1) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for the procedure adopted for career growth of workers

Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % %
The procedure adopted for career growth of workers 58 24 10 8 0 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for the procedure adopted for career growth of workers

Interpretation:
 58% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the procedure adopted for career growth of workers.
 24% of the respondents are satisfied with the procedure adopted for career growth of workers.
 10% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with the procedure adopted for career growth of workers.
 8% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the procedure adopted for career growth of workers.
 NO one is highly dissatisfied with the procedure adopted for career growth of workers.

(2) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for working environment
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % %
Working environment 57 23 10 5 5 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for the working environment

Interpretation:
 57% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the working environment.
 23% of the respondents are satisfied with the working environment.
 10% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with working environment.
 5% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the working environment.
 5% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with the working environment.

(3) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Educational assistance provided for children’s education
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % %
Educational assistance provided for children’s education 30 7 23 33 7 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for the Educational assistance provided for children’s education Interpretation:
 30% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Educational assistance provided for children’s education.
 7% of the respondents are satisfied with Educational assistance provided for children’s education.
 33% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Educational assistance provided for children’s education.
 23% of the respondents are dissatisfied with the Educational assistance provided for children’s education.
 7% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Educational assistance provided for children’s education.

(4) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Organization’s policy for death in harness
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Organization’s policy for death in harness 20 22 37 11 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Organization’s policy for death in harness

Interpretation:
 20% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Organization’s policy for death in harness
 22% of the respondents are satisfied with Organization’s policy for death in harness
 37% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Organization’s policy for death in harness
 11% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Organization’s policy for death in harness
 10% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Organization’s policy for death in harness.

(5) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence 47 30 13 7 3 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence

Interpretation:
 47% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence
 30% of the respondents are satisfied with appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence
 13% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence
 7% of the respondents are dissatisfied with appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence
 3% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence.

(6) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives 40 17 23 10 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives

Interpretation:
 40% of the respondents are highly satisfied with Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives
 17% of the respondents are satisfied with Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives
 23% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives
 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives
 10% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives

(7) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Canteen facilities
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % %
Canteen facilities 56 24 13 5 2

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Canteen facilities

Interpretation:
 56% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Canteen facilities
 24% of the respondents are satisfied with Canteen facilities
 13% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Canteen facilities
 5% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Canteen facilities
 2% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Canteen facilities

(8) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Drinking water facilities
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Drinking water facilities 60 27 7 3 3 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Drinking water facilities

Interpretation:
 60% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Drinking water facilities
 27% of the respondents are satisfied with Drinking water facilities.
 7% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Drinking water facilities
 3% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Drinking water facilities
 3% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Drinking water facilities.

(9) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Occupational health care facilities
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Occupational health care facilities 57 10 13 10 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Occupational health care facilities

Interpretation:
 57% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Occupational health care facilities
 10% of the respondents are satisfied with Occupational health care facilities.
 13% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Occupational health care facilities
 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Occupational health care facilities
 10% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Occupational health care facilities.

(10) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Amenities in the rest room
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % %
Amenities in the rest room 30 7 7 33 23 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Amenities in the rest room

Interpretation:
 30% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Amenities in the rest room
 7% of the respondents are satisfied with Amenities in the rest room.
 7% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Amenities in the rest room
 33% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Amenities in the rest room.
 23% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Amenities in the rest room.

(11) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Frequent medical check up
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Frequent medical check up 37 20 13 20 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Frequent medical checkup

Interpretation:
 37% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the frequent medical checkup.
 20% of the respondents are satisfied with frequent medical checkup.
 13% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with frequent medical checkup.
 20% of the respondents are dissatisfied with frequent medical checkup.
 10% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with frequent medical checkup.

(12) Stress at your work place
Statements Yes NO Total % % % stress at your work place 27 73 100

A pie chart showing the stress levels

Interpretation:
 27% of the respondents say that they face stress at workplace.
 73% of the respondents say that they do not face stress at workplace.

(13) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Retirement benefit
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Retirement benefit 10 50 27 13 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Retirement benefit

Interpretation:
 10% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Retirement benefit
 50% of the respondents are satisfied with Retirement benefit.
 27% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Retirement benefit
 13% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Retirement benefit.
 10% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Retirement benefit.
(14) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for House Rent Allowance
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % HRA 30 27 17 13 13 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for HRA

Interpretation:
 30% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the HRA
 27% of the respondents are satisfied with HRA.
 17% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with HRA
 13% of the respondents are dissatisfied with HRA.
 13% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with HRA.

(15) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Health Insurance
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % %
Health Insurance 47 33 13 7 0 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for health insurance

Interpretation:
 47% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Health Insurance
 33% of the respondents are satisfied with Health Insurance.
 13% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Health Insurance
 7% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Health Insurance.
 0% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Health Insurance.
(16) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Benevolent fund
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Benevolent fund 13 10 33 40 3 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for benevolent fund

Interpretation:
 13% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Benevolent fund
 10% of the respondents are satisfied with benevolent fund.
 33% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Benevolent fund
 40% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Benevolent fund
 3% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Benevolent fund.
(17) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Night Shift Allowance
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % %
Night Shift Allowance 40 23 10 17 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Night Shift Allowance

Interpretation:
 40% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the Night Shift Allowance
 23% of the respondents are satisfied with Night Shift Allowance
 10% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with Night Shift Allowance
 17% of the respondents are dissatisfied with Night Shift Allowance
 10% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with Night Shift Allowance.

(18) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Canteen Subsidy
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Canteen Subsidy 72 14 10 4 0 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for canteen subsidy

Interpretation:
 72% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the canteen subsidy.
 14% of the respondents are satisfied with canteen subsidy
 10% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with canteen subsidy
 4% of the respondents are dissatisfied with canteen subsidy
 0% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with canteen subsidy

(19) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Festival Allowance
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Festival Allowance 33 40 13 10 3 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for festival allowance

Interpretation:
 33% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the festival allowance.
 40% of the respondents are satisfied with festival allowance
 13% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with festival allowance
 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied with festival allowance
 3% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with festival allowance

(20) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Uniform Allowance
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % Uniform Allowance 24 52 13 10 1 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Uniform Allowance

Interpretation:
 24% of the respondents are highly satisfied with the uniform allowance.
 52% of the respondents are satisfied with uniform allowance
 13% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with uniform allowance
 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied with uniform allowance
 1% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with uniform allowance.

(21) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Sickness benefits
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Sickness benefits 23 47 25 3 2 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for sickness benefits

Interpretation:
 23% of the respondents strongly agreed with the Sickness benefits.
 47% of the respondents agreed with Sickness benefits
 25% of the respondents have no opinion about the Sickness benefits
 3% of the respondents disagreed with Sickness benefits
 2% of the respondents strongly disagreed with Sickness benefits.

(22) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Leave travel assistance
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Leave travel assistance 43 27 23 5 2 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Leave travel assistance

Interpretation:
 43% of the respondents strongly agreed with the Leave travel assistance.
 27% of the respondents agreed with Leave travel assistance
 23% of the respondents have no opinion about Leave travel assistance
 5% of the respondents disagreed with Leave travel assistance
 2% of the respondents strongly disagreed with Leave travel assistance.
(23) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Employee injury benefits
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Employee injury benefits 40 23 20 10 7 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Employee injury benefits

Interpretation:
 40% of the respondents strongly agreed with the Employee injury benefits.
 23% of the respondents agreed with Employee injury benefits
 20% of the respondents have no opinion about Employee injury benefits
 10% of the respondents disagreed with Employee injury benefits
 7% of the respondents strongly disagreed with Employee injury benefits.

(24) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Old age benefits
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Old age benefits 50 27 14 5 4 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Old age benefits

Interpretation:
 50% of the respondents strongly agreed with the old age benefits.
 27% of the respondents agreed with old age benefits.
 14% of the respondents have no opinion about old age benefits
 5% of the respondents disagree with old age benefits.
 4% of the respondents strongly disagree with old age benefits.

Satisfaction levels of safety measures
(1) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Safety shoes
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Safety shoes 14 86 0 0 0 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for safety shoes

Interpretation:
 14% of the respondents strongly agreed with the safety shoes.
 86% of the respondents agreed with safety shoes.
 0% of the respondents have no opinion about safety shoes
 0% of the respondents disagreed with safety shoes.
 0% of the respondents strongly disagreed with safety shoes.

(2) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Uniform
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Uniform 52 38 5 5 0 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Uniform Interpretation:
 52% of the respondents strongly agreed with uniform.
 38% of the respondents agreed with uniform.
 5% of the respondents have no opinion about uniform
 5% of the respondents disagreed with uniform.
 0% of the respondents strongly disagreed with uniform.

(3) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell 23 27 20 13 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell Interpretation:
 23% of the respondents strongly agreed with Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell
 27% of the respondents agreed with Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell
 20% of the respondents have no opinion about Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell
 13% of the respondents disagreed with Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell
 10% of the respondents strongly disagreed with Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell.

(4) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Conducive working conditions
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Conducive working conditions 40 20 7 23 10 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Conducive working conditions

Interpretation:
 40% of the respondents strongly agreed with Conducive working conditions
 20% of the respondents agreed with Conducive working conditions
 7% of the respondents have no opinion about Conducive working conditions
 23% of the respondents disagreed with Conducive working conditions
 10% of the respondents strongly disagreed with Conducive working conditions

(5) Table showing the satisfaction levels of the employees for Lighting and ventilation
Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree Total % % % % % % Lighting and ventilation 50 27 10 7 7 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for Lighting and ventilation

Interpretation:
 50% of the respondents strongly agreed with Lighting and ventilation
 27% of the respondents agreed with Lighting and ventilation
 10% of the respondents have no opinion about Lighting and ventilation
 7% of the respondents disagreed Lighting and ventilation
 7% of the respondents strongly disagreed with Lighting and ventilation. Satisfaction levels for overall welfare and safety measures
Table showing the Satisfaction levels for overall welfare and safety measures
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied Total % % % % % % overall welfare and safety measures 27 33 18 10 12 100

A pie chart showing the satisfaction levels for overall welfare and safety measures Interpretation:
 27% of the respondents are highly satisfied with overall welfare and safety measures
 33% of the respondents are satisfied with overall welfare and safety measures
 18% of the respondents are moderately satisfied with overall welfare and safety measures
 10% of the respondents are dissatisfied with overall welfare and safety measures.
 12% of the respondents are highly dissatisfied with overall welfare and safety measures.

CONCLUSION:
The conclusions drawn after the interpretation and analysis of various welfare and safety programmes existing in VST Industries are as follows:
 The company provides good welfare measures and safety programmes.
An employee is a key asset to the organization. He performs the job when he is provided with the good social quality of life and living conditions.
Welfare measures are one of the tools we can build-up employee individually providing him better opportunities. Welfare measures also build stable employee force and promote better relationship between employer and employees.
Thus, welfare measures and safety not only brings development in an individual but also brings development in the organization.

CHAPTER – VI

OBSERVATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

OBSERVATION
 The employees are satisfied by the welfare and safety measures provided by the company.
 The welfare measures provided by the company will affect the motivation and commitment of the employees towards work.
 Among all employees 75% of them gave a positive response towards the welfare measures, and 25% of them gave a negative response towards the welfare measures provided by the company.
 Safety measures are followed strictly in the working area.

RECOMMENDATIONS
 It is suggested that the training programme should be conducted on priority basis for operating new machines.
 Post-retirement benefits should be provided for the employee.
 Management has to develop the financial benefits depending upon the market share.
 Some kind of refreshments like tea or coffee should be provided to the employee during night shifts.
 The quality of the food in the canteen can be further improved and the amenities in the rest room should be provided to all workers.

QUESTIONNAIRE

Please tick the columns highly satisfied, Satisfied, Moderately Satisfied, Dissatisfied, and Highly Dissatisfied as applicable
1. Are you satisfied by the following facilities provided by the company?
Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied
The procedure adopted for career growth of workers
Working environment Educational assistance provided for children’s education
Organization’s policy for death in harness
Appreciation and recognition given to employees for their excellence
Assistance for post death formalities of employees and relatives

2. Are you satisfied by the following welfare measures provided by the company?

Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied
Canteen facilities Drinking water facilities Occupational health care facilities Amenities in the rest room Frequent medical check up

3. Do you face stress at your work place? Yes No

4. Are you satisfied by the following financial benefits provided by the company?

Statements Highly Satisfied Satisfied Moderately Satisfied Dissatisfied Highly Dissatisfied
Retirement benefit HRA Health insurance Benevolent fund Night Shift Allowance Canteen Subsidy Festival Allowance Uniform Allowance

Please tick the columns Strongly Agree, Agree, No Opinion, Disagree, And Strongly Agree as applicable
5. Does the company provide the following facilities?

Statements Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree
Sickness benefits Leave travel assistance Employee injury benefits Old age benefits

Safety Measures
6. Are the following safety measures provided by the company?
Facility Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree
Safety shoes
Uniform
Prevention from inhaling tobacco smell
Facility Strongly agree Agree No opinion Disagree Strongly disagree
Conducive working conditions
Lighting and ventilation
Safe Drinking water/ Rest room

7. Are you satisfied by the overall welfare and safety measures taken by the company?

1. Highly Satisfied 2.Satisfied 3.Moderately Satisfied 4.Dissatisfied

5. Highly Dissatisfied

Kindly give your suggestions for any desired improvements in the current welfare system
………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………
Thank You for your co-operation

BIBLIOGRAPHY

FACTORIES ACT, 1948

VST MEMORANDUM OF SETTLEMENT

Books:
• Human Resource Management, K.Ashwathappa (2008), Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, Fourth Edition

• Industrial Relations, Arun Monappa Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited

• Human Resource Management and Industrial Relations, P.Subbarao (2009), Himalaya Publishing House

Web References:
• Google
• Wikipedia
• Encyclopedia

Websites:
• www.vstindustries.com
• www.vsthyd.com
• www.tobaccoindustries.com
• www.employeewelfaremeasures.com

References: • Google • Wikipedia • Encyclopedia Websites: • www.vstindustries.com • www.vsthyd.com • www.tobaccoindustries.com • www.employeewelfaremeasures.com

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